Course Catalogue 2020-2021

* Summer 2020 courses are listed in Course Catalogue 2019-2020 found in the right sidebar menu.*
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, summer session classes may be delivered via a method other than in-person instruction (including online platforms) for part or all of the term. A final determination of delivery mode will be made by the college offering the course by April 24 for “F” summer courses, and by June 13 for “S” courses. Decisions regarding courses that cannot be accommodated online, or that are to be cancelled, will be communicated to students who have registered in those courses. Course registration for TST Summer courses opens via ACORN on Wednesday, April 1, 2020.

New Testament I

EMB1501HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): TBA

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 16:00 to 19:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Introduction to the major methods and issues in New Testament interpretation: textual criticism; the world of the New Testament; the composition, structure and theologies of the Synoptic Gospels; traditions behind the Gospels; the Jesus of History and the Christ of Faith.

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Introduction to the New Testament

RGB1501HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Lewis, Scott M.

COLLEGE: Regis College SCHEDULE: Mon TIME: 17:00 to 19:00

CREDITS: One Credit

The focus of this course is on the various methodologies for reading and analyzing the New Testament rather than theology and spirituality. The sad events of our own world illustrate some of the dangers of superficial and overly literal readings of religious writings. Biblical literacy should not be the privilege or duty of a select few, but the right and responsibility of all Christians. The purpose of our study is to provide the tools necessary for an in-depth reading of the New Testament utilizing a variety of methodologies. No one methodology is definitive or exhaustive; each one examines the text from a different perspective and reveals another aspect or layer of the passage in question. Although the material might seem technical and esoteric at times, providing the people of God with a biblical message that is rich, life-giving, and based on a sound understanding of the text is an eminently pastoral undertaking.

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From the Gospel to the Gospels (NT I)

WYB1501HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Hamilton, Catherine S.

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Thu TIME: 10:00 to 13:00

CREDITS: One Credit

An introduction to the four Gospels in their social, historical and theological settings. Using a "socio-literary" approach, we will study the Gospels within a two-dimensional framework, both centred on what the early Christians called the "gospel" or "Kerygma." One dimension has to do with social history, the origin and development of Christianity as a distinct social entity, from its foundations in the ministry of Jesus and the Easter experience, through its emergence as a Jewish renewal movement, and on to its development into a separate, largely Gentile, institutionalized religion. The second dimension has to do with literature, the process by which the Gospels came to be written, their literary form and texture, and their character as narrative versions of the "gospel."

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Foundations in Counselling and Spiritual Care Practice for Helping Professional

KNP1512HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Schmidt, Angela E.

COLLEGE: Knox College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 13:30 to 16:15

CREDITS: One Credit

This course will combine lectures with experiential learning to provide helping professionals with the foundational skills of building rapport, empathic listening, effective questioning, interviewing and responding skills, structuring a session, and spiritual care giving. The students will practice the skills of building the therapeutic relationship based on Person-Centered, Family Systems and Psychodynamic theories. We will explore active and passive listening/responding skills alongside of safe and effective use of self in the therapeutic relationship. The course will also address the need for students to understand how to offer multi-cultural support and on-line counselling. The principles of documentation in a variety of settings (congregational, private practice, healthcare) will be discussed. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (a goal-directed collaborative approach to psychotherapeutic change), a Constructivist theory, will be explored and the skills of solution-focused therapy will be applied in small groups. The sensitive integration of spiritually-oriented questions into the therapeutic conversation will be discussed as well as spiritual care interventions and practices that promote healing and wholeness. And finally, students will develop introductory skills in group facilitation.ÿ

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Elementary New Testament Greek

WYB1513YY L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Mon, Wed, Thu TIME: 9:00 to 10:00

CREDITS: Two Credits

Basic New Testament Greek grammar. During the first semester, students work through a large portion of the textbook, which introduces basic grammatical and syntactical elements of the language. In the second semester students complete the introductory grammar textbook, and begin reading in the Greek New Testament.

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Theology & Practice of Ministry

KNP1601HF L6101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): TBA

COLLEGE: Knox College SCHEDULE: N/A TIME: NA to NA

CREDITS: One Credit

Explores various aspects of ministry, in particular the theology and practice of ordained ministry within the Reformed traditions. Topics include understandings of ministry, the call, functions and roles in ministry, challenges and contexts for ministry today and in the future, leadership and authority, and spiritual practices.

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Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin I

SAJ1601HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Abad, John

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: Mon TIME: 9:00 to 11:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course provides students, with no previous experience in the language, basic knowledge of Latin grammatical structure, including verb forms and tenses and the various types of nouns and adjectives. Familiarity with the vocabulary of Christian literature written in the Latin language accompanies the learning process. The lectures cover units 1-19 of Collin?s Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin.

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General Introduction to the Eastern Churches

SMJ1610HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: St. Michael's College SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 17:00 to 19:00

CREDITS: One Credit

The course aims at a general introduction to the four families of Eastern Churches: Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Eastern Catholic and the Assyrian Church of the East. After reviewing the history of the Eastern Churches and the critical moments that shaped their development (including schisms, attempts at re-union and the impact of Islam), the course will give particular attention to the history and culture of the Assyrian Church of the East, the Coptic and Armenian Orthodox Churches, the Orthodox Churches of Ukraine, Greece and Russia, the Maronite, Melkite and Ukrainian Greco-Catholic Churches. Subsequently, the course will briefly survey the East's distinctive approaches to liturgy, art, architecture, music, spiritual life, monasticism, social service, hagiography, mission and theology. The course ends with an assessment of the current state of these Churches in North America and their approaches to inter-Christian and interreligious relations.

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International Development: Global Issues, Power & Players

WYP1615HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Kupp, David

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Thu TIME: 14:00 to 17:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course provides an overview and introduction to global issues, power and players at the heart of international development. As an overview to the macro features, challenges and practices of the humanitarian aid and assistance wor1d, the course helps students build a platform for understanding the field's numerous dimensions and complexity. History, worldviews, approaches and actors are explored across the international development spectrum, as are the patterns and lenses of several Christian perspectives. Understanding is built around the nature and dynamics of poverty and power, and their relationships to the spectrum of development approaches and practices, along with the roles of international agencies, governments, and civil society players in working with the marginalized and vulnerable. Students engage in the sectoral, technical and thematic challenges faced by development organizations in a range of settings. Key features of the course include focus on: - Overview of the development studies world and research methods - Worldviews, meanings and values in international development - Understanding development history - The Millenmum Development Goals - The state of human development: UNDP HDR, World Bank Development Report - Poverty and development -definitions, causes, alternative models, biblical perspectives - Adult Learning Approaches: Pedagogy & Development - Understanding the development spectrum: theories and practices - Global, State and Private Actors - Multilateral actors: UN Conventions, CRC, IFis-SAPs, debt - Civil Society: Grassroots and Local Development - Mainstream, alternative and grassroots definitions and solutions - Development that transforms: holistic approaches, the place of spirituality.

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Community-Based Assessment and Design - Cancelled on Jun 2, 2020

WYP1617HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2020 INSTRUCTOR(S): Postma, Will

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Fri

CREDITS: One Credit

Residents of urban at-risk communities often have ministry done to them by well-meaning people. Organizations (non-proftis, churches, government, etc.) swoop in with money, people and resources and tell the community what they need. Playgrounds are erected overnight, murals painted over, or gardens appear without anyone asking the people who live there what they want. The message that no one listens is reinforced in their minds. God's concept of "shalom" is not one of doing to people but one of inviting people to participate in their own community development. Students in this course will develop the skills necessary to engage a local community. This approach is guided through the development tools of community assessment (listening to the community) and project design, monitoring and evaluation (responding with the coomunity to a limitation). At the end of this course students will have the skills necessary to involve the community in its own restoration.

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