Course Catalogue 2017-2018

Theological Anthropology

SAT2600HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S): Anang, Charles

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: N/A

CREDITS: One Credit

This course is an exploration of the following themes in the light of Christian revelation: creation, the human person, sin, grace, and eschatology. Readings, Handouts, Lectures in the form of PowerPoint presentations, Discussion Board reflec tions aqnd responses, and unit tests.

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Theology of Ministry

SMP2600HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: St. Michael's College SCHEDULE: Sat TIME: 9:00 to 13:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course will explore the foundations of ministry in the New Testament, the manifold expressions of ministry in the history of the Church, and a variety of contemporary issues related to the theology and practice of ministry from a Roman Catholic perspective. Also important will be the relationship of ministry to other aspects of theology, such as Christology, pneumatology, grace, mission, ecclesiology, and sacraments.

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Ecumenism

SAT2601HS L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S): Marrocco, Mary

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: Sat TIME: 9:00 to 16:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Explores historical sources of division among Christian churches, origins of the modern ecumenical movement, the commitment of the Roman Catholic Church to Christian unity, growing agreement in sacramental life. Special attention to implications for catechesis and pastoral care of inter-church families.

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Theology of Religions - Cancelled on Jul 27, 2017

KNT2608HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S): Fensham, Charles James

COLLEGE: Knox College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 9:00 to 11:00

PRE-REQUISITES: A basic introductory theology course. CREDITS: One Credit

This course will explore major approaches to the relationship between the Christian faith and other religions in the context of the plurality and diversity of the contemporary world.ÿ

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Synoptic Gospels

SAB2612HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S): Werbylo, Walter

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 9:00 to 11:00

PRE-REQUISITES: An introduction to New Testament course. CREDITS: One Credit

Apostolic preaching and its development in Gospel writing. A look at the Synoptic Question. Special introduction to first three gospels, with attention to the themes and theology of each tradition. Exegetical study of selected passages in Mark, completed with reference to accounts in Matthew and Luke.

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Gospel , Church & Culture

WYP2618HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S): Paulsen, Judy

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 14:00 to 16:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course will explore the relationship between the gospel, church and culture, and what their interaction means for leadership in today's church. It will begin by examining the role of culture in human society, and will then discuss four key doctrines of the church that inform an understanding of culture. Worldview will be examined as a tool for understanding culture, and the course will look specifically at what the shift from modernity to post-modernity means for the church and its mission. This course will include Biblical material, reference the experience of cross-cultural missionaries, and examine aspects of Canadian and American culture. These will form the backdrop for discussion about what it means to be a missional church in contemporary north America.

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Urban Poverty and Development

WYP2623HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 11:00 to 13:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Reviews the challenges faced by urban development facilitators today. Engages urbanisation and migration across the planet (especially the global South), the data on urban poverty, and today's blurring of rural and urban into a continuous, dynamic rural-urban continuum. Looks at the role of NGOs, churches and other partners in working with the urban poor, and reviews a range of urban community-based development approaches. Also considers the five types of urban communities, the new physics

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Classic Buddhist Texts

EMT2629HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 18:30 to 20:30

CREDITS: One Credit

Classic Buddhist scriptures have been traditionally classified in three major Categories: Sotra texts that record the teachings of the historical Buddha, Vrnaya texts that narrate disciplinary rules for the Buddhist monastic community, and Sastra texts that function as commentarial treatises on the Buddha's teachings; This course introduces students to classic Buddhist texts in each of these three categories to lielp students become familiar with literary discourse on foundational Buddhist doctrines, ethics, and thought. In this class, students will learn the history of the formation and t!1e reception of a list of carefully selected canonical texts in each category, read English translations of the original text. When available, original editions of these texts in Sanskrit, Pali, Chinese, or Tibetan will also be provided for those who are interested in exploring further.

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Buddhist Ethics - Cancelled on Mar 31, 2017

EMT2630HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 9:00 to 11:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Buddhism is a response to what is fundamentally an ethical problem -the perennial problem of the best kind of life for us to lead. The Buddha was driven to seek the solution to this problem and the associated ethical issues it arises. This course introduces students to explore whether an Asian religion such as Buddhism can shed any light on problems that the West has found difficult and controversial. The course applies Buddhist ethics to a range of issues of contemporary concern, including abortion, euthanasia, suicide, war, environmentalism, etc., and discusses the Buddhist response to ethical dilemmas confronting our modern societies. It also develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions, and compare that against the Christian perspective. Since Buddhist ethics is an unfamiliar subject in the West, the course will take on various issues from a Christian perspective first as a point of departure. This allows students to examine the different ethical standards sparked from different religious orientations. Through such discussions, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the Buddhist moral teachings and how many of these ancient, Indian approaches could be modified and remained meaningful in our contemporary society. The class format will take on a variety of styles, including lectures, critical reading of canonical texts, academic works and films, exploring and examining the Buddhist principles in different contexts through class discussion, and the comparative reading of Buddhist ethics against the "norm" of Christian ethics in the Western world.

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Foundational Tenets and Practices of Buddhism

EMT2631HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2017 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 9:00 to 11:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This survey course provides students with an overview of the basic tenets, major figures, important developments, and the meditative principles of Buddhism. It will serve as an important foundation for the understanding of the various forms of applied Buddhism. Students will learn to appreciate the traditional Buddhist critique of our human condition and its aspiration to attain a transcendental spiritual goal. On that basis, students will also come to an understanding of the meanings behind the Buddhist practices and cultures. Such a foundation is important for the students to understand the needs for the modern developments of engaged Buddhism, Buddhist Ethics, dialogues with Western psychologists on the Buddhist view of the mind, and Buddhist contemplative care. The major Buddhist doctrines in the course are introduced through important works of scholarly studies, alongside with the reading of the English translation of passages from the Buddhist canon. This allows the students to examine the primary sources, instead of relying entirely on scholarly interpretation of the teachings. It is also important to remind students that Buddhism is not just a philosophy or a school of thought, but a spiritual tradition that emphasizes the cultivation of meditative states. Therefore, different forms of meditation are examined to see how they are employed as a means to realize the various levels of enlightened mind.

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