Course Catalogue 2016-2017

Encountering the Bible - Cancelled on Mar 28, 2016

WYB1902HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Jervis, Ann

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Thu TIME: TBA to TBA

CREDITS: One Credit

Who are the main characters in the Bible? What are the essential themes and events tied to these characters? How do Old Testament characters, themes and events appear in the New Testament? What are the great stories in the Old Testament? What are the major concepts and convictions in the New Testament? The ability to answer these basic, yet fundamental questions is an essential tool for further study in Bible and other aspects of Theology. This course introduces basic, introductory information to students who have little to no previous knowledge of the Biblical material. By taking this introductory course students will gain knowledge of key Biblical texts and ideas and be prepared for further study.

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Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

SMT1904HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): McQueen, Moira

COLLEGE: St. Michael's College SCHEDULE: Mon TIME: 17:00 to 19:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course explores themes required for an understanding of the moral subject and moral actions. Topics include: Old Testament and New Testament ethics; current ethical theories especially Natural Law; formation of conscience, sin, conversion and the role of the Magisterium.

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Ethical Reflections on Pastoral Practice

RGT1905HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Regis College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 14:00 to 17:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Basic principles of Christian ethics, with special attention to the pastoral application of moral theology. Case-study method used.

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Moral Theology

SAT1905HF L0102 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Murphy, Patricia Belgrave, Kevin P.

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: N/A TIME: NA to NA

CREDITS: One Credit

An introduction to Catholic moral theology, including the fundamental theological meaning of the moral life, a brief survey of the history of Catholic moral thought, the sources of moral knowledge and action: reason, faith, and the role of the magisterium; freedom and law; conscience, virtue, grace and sin; and the elements of moral action - object, intention, and circumstances. Particular attention will be given to the teaching of the 1993 Encyclical Letter Veritatis splendor.

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Moral Theology

SAT1905HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Murphy, Patricia

COLLEGE: St. Augustine's Seminary SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 18:00 to 20:00

CREDITS: One Credit

An introduction to Catholic moral theology, including the fundamental theological meaning of the moral life, a brief survey of the history of Catholic moral thought, the sources of moral knowledge and action: reason, faith, and the role of the magisterium; freedom and law; conscience, virtue, grace and sin; and the elements of moral action - object, intention, and circumstances. Particular attention will be given to the teaching of the 1993 Encyclical Letter Veritatis splendor.

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A History of the Church in the Middle Ages

TRH2002HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Graham, Barry

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Thu TIME: 11:00 to 13:00

CREDITS: One Credit

The course aims to provide a general knowledge of mediaeval church history (600 - 1500) presented in a text and by exercising critical reasoning through analysing 3 primary texts chosen by the student. The reality of the church's life shown by the clergy, laity and in its worship is made tangible through manuscript, artistic and architectural material from videos and Power Point presentations.

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Buddhist Perspectives on Mental Illness

EMP2010HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Tue TIME: 18:30 to 20:30

CREDITS: One Credit

For Buddhists, well-being/non-well-being are states of being along a continuum. Though dis-ease suggests an absence of ease, Buddhists see it less as illness than as a consequence of ignorance, attachment to ego-self, and delusion, or, failing to see reality as it is. The Buddhist response to this delusory state is spiritual, designed to release a suffering person from his burning state of mind to bring about a thorough transformation of consciousness using multiple techniques/ approaches. The natural healthy state of mind is arrived at through cultivation of the mind, ethics and wisdom. In the state of non-well-being, symptoms might include loss of control, restlessness, or failure to adapt, identified by modern clinicians as anxiety, stress, trauma, and evidence of psychopathology. Clinical psychology's task is to map out the mind with labels for every aberration of the mind from what it deems as the norm. The two traditions have, however, a common goal: to take away suffering. To that end, clinical psychotherapists and mind scientists have begun to mine Buddhist techniques/ teachings for healing patients. Techniques such as mindfulness (e.g. Mindfulness Based Stress Reductions (MBSR)), teachings of compassion and self-emptying (e.g. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)), and being present/ accepting things as-is (Acceptance & Commitment Therapy) are some examples of simulating the Buddhist model of well-being by using some aspects of it. This course will have two components: it will consider the Buddhist perspective on mental well-being by looking at the exemplary figure of the Bodhisattva whose great vow is to help all beings and whose modus operandi is compassion and wisdom. Using this model, we will attempt to understand what constitutes delusion and its effects on the mind. We will look at several therapeutic paradigms and take up case studies where clinicians have incorporated Buddhist teachings and the different techniques in secular ways/settings.

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Biblical Foundations

ICB2010HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Ansell, Nicholas

COLLEGE: Institute for Christian Studies SCHEDULE: Wed TIME: 9:30 to 12:30

CREDITS: One Credit

This course will explore the Bible as the ongoing story of and for God and creation, paying special attention to the way in which God's story is intertwined with that of humanity and the world. In asking whether and in what way the Bible is also our story, we will attempt to identify which hermeneutical methods might help us discern its significance for present day life, including the academic enterprise.

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History of Christianity II

TRH2010HF L0101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): Billett, Jesse

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Mon TIME: 14:00 to 16:00

CREDITS: One Credit

The history of the Christian Church (mainly in the West) from the birth of a spiritually united medieval Europe under Charlemagne to its fragmentation in the Reformation and the Thirty Years' War; Pagans and missionaries; Popes and patriarchs. Princes and councils; Reformers and radicals; Monks and friars. Theology and heresy; Daily Christian life and worship;

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Church and Ministry - Cancelled on Jul 26, 2016

CGP2011HF L4101 SESSION: Fall 2016 INSTRUCTOR(S): TBA

COLLEGE: Conrad Grebel SCHEDULE: TBA TIME: TBA to TBA

PRE-REQUISITES: N/A CREDITS: One Credit

This course explores the development of a theology of ministry, which includes the church's mission and institutional life and the personal calling to a life of ministry. The Believers Church tradition provides the primary perspective, augmented by the experience of the global and ecumenical church.

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