Course Catalogue 2013-2014

Diakonia of Congregational Administration

TRP2721HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S): Deller, Walter

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Tue, Thu TIME: 18:00 to 21:00

CREDITS: One Credit

This course will explore an essential role of clergy in offering oversight and service to key aspects of the unfolding of congregational life. What is the relationship between this practical work of the laity, theology, and congregational health? How can clergy offer intelligent oversight and service to lay leadership with out interfering and micromanaging? In dialogue and discussion with expert practitioners we will focus on basic skills and awareness necessary to effective leadership in the areas of congregational administration, including: finances and budgeting, property and buildings, stewardship, volunteer management and personnel supervision and feedback, organizing the weekly Sunday liturgy. Though the course will draw on Anglican polity and examples, the issues addressed by the course are faced in various forms by congregational leaders across denominations.

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New Testament Responses to Violence

EMB2801HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri TIME: 13:30 to 16:30

CREDITS: One Credit

A variety of recent political events have confronted students of theology with the spectre of violence in recent years, inevitably raising the question of how to engage the issue theologically. This course will aid students' engagement with various forms of violence (imperial, gender, economic, etc.) through the various New Testament authors and their own dealings with the issues. Indeed, insofar as the Bible is accorded significant political value, it is vital - regardless of one's own religious proclivities - to understand what the texts contained in the New Testament have to report on these issues in their own era. This course surveys various points at which New Testament authors encountered the violence. It aims to acquaint students with the social world of the New Testament, to familiarize students in major issues in the study of the New Testament, and to aid students in the development of a biblical hermeneutic conscious of its implications.

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Ministry and Technology

TRP2810HF L6101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S): Power, Thomas P.

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Online

CREDITS: One Credit

Is it legitimate to use technology to communicate the gospel? Explores the function and use of the tools of technology in the varied ministry of the church. Asks critical questions about technology and its use. In the context of addressing issues such as virtual community, media arts and worship, internet-based ministry, Christian education and youth ministry, and spirituality online, the course seeks to equip students with skills in this new area of ministry. Discussion forums, online projects, reflections paper.

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Communication Rights & Religion

EMP2831HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri TIME: 9:00 to 16:30

CREDITS: One Credit

This introduction to the intersection of communication rights and religion offers an intensive cross-cultural learning environment, brining together students and scholars from the Global South and North. It articulates communications rights issues through the lens of contextual, practical theology. Issues explored against global contextual backgrounds include: inter-religious dialogue and peace building, gender and media, Indigenous rights, citizen journalism and digital frontiers, disability and accessibility rights. Students will engage these issues through interdisciplinary lectures, group work, plenary discussion, and written work. Class time will attend to both methodological issues and contextual case studies. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity for cross-cultural and ecumenical learning, exposure to emerging social justice issues, and skills to attend to communication rights issues in their own ministerial contexts.
This course will serve as a designated elective in Church and Community under the MDiv degree program.

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Writing Sacred Stories and Worshipful Plays

TRP2862HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Mon, Wed, Fri TIME: 9:00 to 15:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Scripted improv and writing styles, dialogue, storyline, language, editing and mime script as elements of writing plays and stories for faith communities and seekers. A writing course to develop sacred stories for one person or many to present as homily or drama and to contribute to God’s ongoing living Gospel. A good companion course to TRP2871HF We The Storytellers.

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We the Story Tellers: Blending God's Story with our Stories Dramatically

TRP2871HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Trinity College SCHEDULE: Sat TIME: 9:00 to 16:00

CREDITS: One Credit

Improvisation, theatre games, mask, mime and voice work as a basis for acting and story telling in faith communities; brief histories of liturgical drama; telling and exegesis of the Story in a society that is becoming biblically illiterate; finding creative ways to present individual gospels. Evaluation: Presentation of 10-minute performance piece; written report. (Academic mentor: David Neelands)

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Why Scrolls Matter. An Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls as a Template for Abrahamic Traditions - Cancelled on Mar 4, 2014

EMB2911HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Sat TIME: 10:00 to 17:00

CREDITS: One Credit

The Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) provide an important template for those wishing to studyscripture or exegetical material of any Abrahamic tradition (whether Jewish, Christian, or Muslim) and its formation. The scrolls frequently reinterpret texts which highlight a "particular type of intertextuality which exists between an authoritative scriptural antecedent and its subsequent reuse in a type of rewriting, in which there is a close textual relationship between the scriptural predecessor and the rewritten work" (Petersen 2012: 485). This tradition of reinterpreted scripture, seen as a "textual strategy" (Petersen 484), is present within varying DSS literary genres of authoritative scriptural texts, legal rules, religious disputes, liturgical traditions, and even commentaries. Such a practice of reinterpreting earlier texts is found within not only Jewish scripture but is also similar to what one finds in early Christian and Islamic scriptural and exegetical traditions as' well. Having such a comprehension is helpful for exegesis and understanding the underlying purpose of any of the above scriptural and textual traditions. Thus this course undertakes a study of the practice of reinterpreted scripture as evidenced in the DSS genres of scripture, legal rules, religious disputes, liturgical traditions, and commentaries (pesharim). An introduction to the scrolls, their discovery and preservation, their sectarian nature and the related history of the Qumran site will also be addressed as an essential component of understanding the nature of the scrolls.

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Reading Biblical Texts Contextually: Mark and Paul in Asian Biblical Interpretation - Cancelled on May 12, 2014

EMB2941HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S):

COLLEGE: Emmanuel College SCHEDULE: Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri TIME: 9:30 to 12:30

CREDITS: One Credit

All reading of biblical texts takes place in a context. Paying attention to how context affects reading provides insight, not only into the process of the reception of biblical texts, but also into the biblical texts themselves. This course explores the dynamic of reading biblical texts by examining how selected passages from the Gospel of Mark and the letters of Paul have been taken up in recent years specifically within two related fields of discourse: what is often described as Asian biblical interpretation, and its cousin, Asian American biblical interpretation. Through assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, student presentations, and individual case studies of specific biblical texts, this course will introduce students to published materials in Asian and Asian American biblical interpretation, and in so doing give students an opportunity to reflect on their own context as a lens for interpretation.

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Theological Field Education

RGF3010HF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S): Lavin, Margaret

COLLEGE: Regis College SCHEDULE: TIME: TBA to TBA

CREDITS: One Credit

This is the required theological and professional preparation for ministry two-credit course for the Master of Divinity Program. It is a 250 hour ministry placement in a supervised ministry setting chosen by the student in consultation with the Director of Theological Field Education. Supervised ministry provides divinity candidates with the opportunity to gain professional competence, build a framework for raising practical theological issues, acquire a comprehensive and realistic view of the church and its ministries, and develop a ministerial identity. Means of evaluation: Contextual analysis, case study, self-evaluation, and supervisor evaluation of the candidate. Pass/Fail.

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Parish Internship

WYF3020YF L0101 SESSION: Summer 2014 INSTRUCTOR(S): TBA

COLLEGE: Wycliffe College SCHEDULE: Irregular

CREDITS: Two Credits

A three-month full time internship in a parish setting, immersing the student in the dynamics of congregational life.

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