Historical Courses for the 2012 Winter Session

Course Listings by Level

1000 Level Courses
WYH1010HS  L0101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Class participation, course portfolio, one short essay, and two other academic exercises (choice of reading notes, short papers, weekly quizzes, final exam, etc.).

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Alan L. Hayes
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMH1010HS  L0101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Lectures, 2 seminars. One synthetic paper, one essay.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Marcos Antonio Ramos
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
SAH2002HS  L0101

Medieval Christianity (600-1500)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of Church and society in the Middle Ages; its development of thought and piety. Lectures, discussions, minor paper, major paper, final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
KNH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity, may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Prerequisite: 1000 level history course. Primary source, assignment, paper, take home final.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. The course will consist of lectures, small group discussions, and oral reports that summarize small group discussions. Mid-term assignments; choice of final exam or research papers. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Prequisite: History of Christianity I or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Brian Clarke
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

AttachmentSize
EMH 2010 Course Outline - Winter 2012 Draft.doc91 KB
TRH2105HS  L6101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH2105HS  L0101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 214
TRH2210HS  L0101

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine how Christianity has both contributed to the
emergence of the modern world and has responded to some of the major
developments that characterize modernity. Topics may include the impact
of new ways of thinking on Christian world views; movements of
religious renewal; Christian responses to new social trends and
development; the geographic expansion of Christianity; developments in
Christian practice and worship; Christianity and public life; new
trends in Christian thought.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location:  Trinity College Room TC 24
TRH2212HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/07/14

Dying for the Faith: Martyrdom in Early Modern Europe and Beyond, 1400-1750

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of the concept of martyrdom and its literature during the early modern period, its political and theological causes, and its inspirational and polemical role in the consolidation of early modern religious traditions. The course will also discuss methods of approaching martyrology across various denominations and regional settings including England, Reformation Europe, the Americas and the Orthodox Church in various countries. Evaluation: short assignments, participation, short presentation and final exam or research paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location:  Trinity College Room TC22
SAH2224HS  L0101

20th Century Church History, 1900-1960

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

Sketches 4 major cultural challenges facing the pre-Vatican Church, 1900-1960.Explores various individual attempts to find creative solutions to these problems, as well as the main official responses from the Magisterium. Lecture-Seminars and readings. Weekly email questions, three 2-page papers and final exam [take-home].

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Janine Langan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
SAH2251HS  L0101

The Reformation Era

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The background of the Reformation, especially in the late Middle Ages; the central figures of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin and Zwingli; the special circumstances of the English Reformation and the spiritual renewal of the Counter-Reformation. Lectures, readings, class discussion, minor papers critical book report, major reasearch essay, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Peter M. Meehan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 30
TRH2253HS  L6101

Modern Atheism

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

This introductory course surveys the history of atheism and secularization from the mid-eighteenth-century Western European Enlightenment to the present. We will not only read selections from some of the most important English, Scottish, German, and American atheists, agnostics, and rationalists of the period, but also examine and discuss how contemporary political and social thought contributed to the rise of secular thought and gradual decline in theological orthodoxy. The course will demonstrate how the writings of atheists and theological rationalists have always been predicated on significant intellectual and emotional tensions between orthodox Christianity and contemporary culture. Participation, research summary, book report, online final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: Tuesdays
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
WYH2311HS  L0101

History of Missions and Development

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Online Course

Outlines the history of Christian missions from its beginnings in Pentecost to the end of the 20th century, followed by area studies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Europe, and concluding with a consideration of the transition from missions to development to post-development. Short papers and collaborative internet project.

 

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH2316HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/01/04

Philosophy of Ecclesiastical History: Sacred and Profane

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  New Course · Online Course

This introductory historiographical course surveys select “sacred” and “profane” works of church history by some of the most important ecclesiastical historians and philosophers active from the mid-first century AD until the mid-twentieth century. Participation in online discussion group, research paper, critical response/book report, online final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: Thursdays
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2401HS  L0101

Medieval Eastern Thought, Doctrine, and Theology: from Chalcedon to Palamas

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of "Byzantine" and "Oriental" Orthodox mentalities and doctrines after the monophysite controversy and Council of Chalcedon; failure to heal this rift in theology for the next 200 years, even by two more ecumenical councils. Other theological issues of the period: grace and faith, epistemology and hesychasm, the Creed, and filioque. Selections from key Fathers of this era and from documents of 4th - 6th Councils.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 340
TRH2421HS  L0101

The Emerging Christian Church: Church History to 451

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The first 450 years of Christianity reveal an essential central notion that faith requires ecclesiology and church membership for salvation; but the concrete history of the world-wide church reveals a rough-and-tumble dynamic of competing choices about the truth that constitute "church"; can an "Orthodox norm" of tradition and apostolicity be recognized in such a situation? Study of social, institutional, theological, spiritual,pastoral, "Gospel-and-local-culture", political, aspects of church life from primary sources. Not open to students who take - History of Christianity I (to AD 843).

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 340
3000 Level Courses
TRH3236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

AD students enrol in TRH6236HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 212
EMH3371HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/12/06

Varieties of North American Christianity

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year but will focus on issues related to approaches to spiritual formation and the relationships between individual experience, social transformation, and institutional identity in North American contexts. Seminar format involving student leadership; discussion of assigned readings, presentation of research.

AD students enrol in EMH6371HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
TRH3725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as “liturgy” in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy.Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

AD students enrol in TRH6725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 213
RGH3755HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/05/16

Theology & Spirituality of Icons

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

AD students enrol in RGH6755HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
ICH3757HS  L0101

Beauty: Theology, Ethics or Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Is beauty simply “in the eye of the beholder” or is it something more? Is it a way to God, a moral precept, or the specific locus for a unique kind of pleasure? This course examines a variety of subjective and objective views of beauty in the history of Western philosophy and theology from antiquity to the present (e.g. in the thought of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Weil, Barth, and Balthasar). It will also consider the implications of these views of beauty for the production of the visual arts, music, and literary culture in Western religion and society.

AD students enrol in ICH6757HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TXH3806HS  L0101

Calvin, Wesley, & Canada

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will look at the Reformed and Methodist traditions associated with the theologies of John Calvin and John Wesley, their roots, development, and intersection, particularly in Canada. Themes such as mission, evangelism, engagement with society, theological convergences and controversies will be explored, with specific reference to The Presbyterian Church in Canada, The United Church of Canada, and their antecedent denominations. Lectures and discussion. Evaluation: Informed participation in group discussions; mid-term writing assignment; final project.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart, Stuart Macdonald
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMH3874HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/03/22

Immigrant Spirituality and Canadian Religions

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Canada is a nation of immigrants, and the Canadian religions are the religions of immigrants. The waves of religious immigrants will be studied including 17C French, 18C Irish and Scottish, 19C German, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian immigrants; 20C English, Italian, and Portuguese to the more recent Caribbean, Filipino, Chinese, Tamils, Vietnamese, and Korean religionists. The attitudes of Euro-Canadians will be examined as they progress from Anglo-Celtic Calvinism to Canadian secular multiculturalism. The techniques of archival research, historical analysis, and historiography will be explored. Seminar presentation and research paper. Class Presentation 30%; Research Essay 40%; Collaborative Recapitulation (open book exam) 30%.

AD students enrol in SMH6874HS.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
5000 Level Courses
ICH5151HS  L0101

Individuality in the Franciscan Thought of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will examine the doctrine of individuality (and individuation) developed by the two Franciscan thinkers John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham and the configuration of their thought as one or another form of discursive “individualism.”  It does so against the backdrop of their participation within the Franciscan spiritual tradition on the one hand and the Aristotelianism of their university environment and training. In so doing, it explores a properly historical understanding of a philosophical figure’s choice of discursive type. Texts: Francis of Assisi, Collected Works; John Duns Scotus, Philosophical Writings, On Individuation; William of Ockham, Philosophical Writings

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMH5372HS  L0101

Religion & Public Life in Canada

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Seminar exploring patterns of involvement of religion in the public sphere. Traditional assumptions about church and state, impact of 19th-century "disestablishment" and 20th-century pluralism, Catholicism and the state in Quebec, women as religious reformers, the social gospel, Christian populism in the prairies, ecumenical and evangelical approaches to public engagement, implications of constitutional change are among the topics considered. Informed participation, mid-term written assignment, research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:00 to 18:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart, Mark G. Toulouse
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is crosslisted: RLG3237.
Additional Notes: Room 105.
TRH5751HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2012/01/10

Mediaeval Liturgical Commentaries

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Most people, when the subject of mediaeval liturgy is mentioned, think of the old service books which have the words spoken (sacramentaries, lectionaries, missals, breviaries) and descriptions of the action (ordos). There is another class of book entirely, the liturgical commentaries, which goes through the public services, explaining the elements they contain. They were also interested in the ministers of the liturgy, their orders and dress, in the structure of church and altar, in the calendar (temporal and sanctoral), and of course in the vexed question of how a priest computed the date of Easter (no diocesan journals in those days). Teaching methods: shared reading of 4 commentaries with explanations by the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 2 · Max: 6
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 212
6000 Level Courses
TRH6236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3236HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 212
EMH6371HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/12/06

Varieties of North American Christianity

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year but will focus on issues related to approaches to spiritual formation and the relationships between individual experience, social transformation, and institutional identity in North American contexts. Seminar format involving student leadership; discussion of assigned readings, presentation of research.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMH3371HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
TRH6725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as “liturgy” in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy. Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location:  Larkin Building Room 213
RGH6755HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/05/16

Theology & Spirituality of Icons

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGH3755HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
ICH6757HS  L0101

Beauty: Theology, Ethics or Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Is beauty simply “in the eye of the beholder” or is it something more? Is it a way to God, a moral precept, or the specific locus for a unique kind of pleasure? This course examines a variety of subjective and objective views of beauty in the history of Western philosophy and theology from antiquity to the present (e.g. in the thought of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Weil, Barth, and Balthasar). It will also consider the implications of these views of beauty for the production of the visual arts, music, and literary culture in Western religion and society.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3757HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMH6874HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2011/03/22

Immigrant Spirituality and Canadian Religions

Offered in Winter 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Canada is a nation of immigrants, and the Canadian religions are the religions of immigrants. The waves of religious immigrants will be studied including 17C French, 18C Irish and Scottish, 19C German, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian immigrants; 20C English, Italian, and Portuguese to the more recent Caribbean, Filipino, Chinese, Tamils, Vietnamese, and Korean religionists. The attitudes of Euro-Canadians will be examined as they progress from Anglo-Celtic Calvinism to Canadian secular multiculturalism. The techniques of archival research, historical analysis, and historiography will be explored. Seminar presentation and research paper. Class Presentation 30%; Research Essay 40%; Collaborative Recapitulation (open book exam) 30%.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMH3874HS.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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Historical Courses for the <em>2012</em> Winter Session

Historical Courses for the <em>2012</em> Winter Session