Theological Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of 2013-2014

Course Listings by Level

Crosslisted Courses

1000 Level Courses
WYT1101HF  L0101

The God of the Gospel: Systematic Theology I

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course provides an in-depth exploration of two central Christian doctrines - the Trinity and the person of Christ - as well as reflection on the role of Holy Scripture and the nature of theology. This is the first part of a two-part sequence in basic Christian doctrine. Lectures, tutorial discussions generated by students' questions, question and answer periods. Short papers, final take-home exam. Tutorial 10-11 am.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT1101HS  L0101

The God of the Gospel: Systematic Theology I

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Canada - other Site

This course provides an in-depth exploration of two central Christian doctrines - the Trinity and the person of Christ - as well as reflection on the role of Holy Scripture and the nature of theology. This is the first part of a two-part sequence in basic Christian doctrine. Lectures, tutorial discussions generated by students' questions, question and answer periods. Short papers, final take-home exam. Tutorial 10-11 am.

Schedule:
Instructors: Joseph Mangina, David Widdicombe
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Course offered in Winnipeg. For registration please contact the Wycliffe Registrar's Office
EMT1101HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/17

Theology I

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to theology, including introductory treatment of theological method, creation, God, Christology, Trinity, soteriology, and eschatology. Requirements: lectures, short paper, take-home examination, final research paper. Perquisite: basic course in Bible.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Natalie Wigg-Stevenson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT1101HS  L0101

Systematic Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Offers an overview of the principles, resources, and central themes of Christian theology - revelation, the doctrines of the Trinity, the person and work of Jesus Christ, and humanity in relation to God. Discussion paper, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
KNT1101HS  L0101

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces students to the central categories of Christian theology as these loci have been developed in what the Christian tradition has called Systematic Theology.  The course will focus on how these major doctrinal themes have been articulated in the Reformed Protestant tradition, and set this perspective in dialogue with other traditional, contemporary, and ecumenical perspectives in theology.  Each topic will be explored in relation to its classical formulation as well as with reference to modern (and postmodern) reassessments of the classical tradition in the cultural and global context of the Christian churches in the 21st century.  Lectures,  weekly reflection assignments, final essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John A. Vissers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
CGT1101HF  L4101

Thinking Theologically

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Waterloo Site

An introduction to the main themes in theology, with attention to the nature of theological argumentation. Trinity, creation, theological anthropology, Jesus Christ, ecclesiology, other religions, eschatology, Anabaptist-Mennonite theology, political theology, modernity/postmodernity, the vocation of the theologian. Lectures, discussions of readings, midterm take-home test, student presentations, reflection paper, research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Jeremy M. Bergen
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1101HF  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to theology and the elements of Catholic theology. Revelation, Faith, Tradition, Church doctrine, infallibility, biblical inspiration. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT1101HF  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines the historical development and contemporary practice of theology as an exercise of intellectual probity and religious commitment. Topics include the origins of Christian theology, its historical development, the relationship of religious narrative to religious doctrine, faith and reason, revelation and authority, tradition and development. The course introduces Bernard Lonergan’s Method in Theology as a framework for conceiving theology as a unity of interrelated functions including exegesis and doctrine, systematic understanding, pastoral communication, and responses to contemporary hermeneutical challenges. Quizes, short papers, one 4-6 page paper, class preparation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jeremy Wilkins
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
SMT1101HS  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: TBA
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
WYT1105HF  L0101

Teaching the Faith: Introduction to Catechetical Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is designed for new students, and acts as an introduction to a number of central pastoral responsibilities: teaching the faith to new Christians, grasping the overall shape and purpose of Christian theology, assessing and meeting the demands of local culture and context, engaging the character of conversion and formation, and finally, grasping an overall shape to the history of Christian witness. The course pursues the historical examination of key catechetical texts from the New Testament to the contemporary period, analyzes their content and purpose, locates them historically, and seeks to engage students' own comprehensive vision of the Gospel, its communication, and pastoral practice. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source reading. Extensive reading, discussion, and mastering of content. Weekly content quizzes; 3 papers (6-10 pages each); final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday, 14:00 to 15:30
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT1106HF  L0101

Introduction to Missional Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course seeks both to introduce the different theological subspecialties, even as it orients the whole enterprise. It uses as its organizing concept that of mission. This also brings into play questions of our own cultural moment and the practical task of the church. Lectures, tutorials. Evaluation: class participation, two short reflection papers, one major paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: J. Glen Taylor
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1703HS  L0101

Scholastic Philosophical Concepts

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to scholastic terms and concepts in the context of their use in the philosophical theology of Thomas Aquinas. Readings cover texts that treat the existence and attributes of God, being and essence, form and matter, substance and accident, the human soul and its faculties, happiness, human action, and natural law. Lectures, discussion; short papers, essay, and final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT1710HF  L0101

Critical Thinking

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A course focused on developing skills in natural reasoning: identification and evaluation of arguments and explanations; deductive and inductive reasoning; criteria of evidence and cogency; fallacies; inference to the best explanation. Lectures with demonstration of problems; weekly assignments.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
TRT1711HF  L0101

Introduction to Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Primer for theological students with little or no background in philosophical thought. Attention to revolutionary developments in philosophical thought and how they have influenced development of Christian faith. Book analysis, exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
EMT1851HF  L0101

Surat al-Baqara: An Introduction to the Qur'an

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Located in the beginning of the Qur'an immediately following a short introductory prayer, Surat al-Baqara is the doorway to understanding this scripture and its distinctive style and organization of ideas. The largest chapter in the corpus, it covers the major themes and discourses and is uniquely suited to begin the study of the Qur'an and related scholarship. This course is an introduction to the Qur'an and will familiarize students with the hallmarks of both traditional and western scholarships. It will cover topics such as the collection of the Qur'an, abrogation, mysterious letters and the Quranic sciences. Students will become acquainted with some of the main classical and modern commentaries and will learn how to identify Surat al-Baqara's distinctive structure and unifying themes.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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SAT1901HF  L0101

Fundamental Christian Ethics I

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the foundations and objective dimensions of Catholic moral theology. Among the topics to be studied are scripture, natural moral law, casuistry, relationship between faith and morality, magisterium, moral principles and norms, etc. Readings, lectures, discussions, short papers and final written exam; the course will also include a limited online component.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
SAT1902HS  L0101

Fundamental Christian Ethics II

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the subjective dimensions of Catholic moral theology. Among the topics to be considered are concepts of the person, freedom and responsibility, conscience, aspects of moral decision making, virtue and vice. Lectures, discussions, readings, short papers and final exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I.)

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
SMT1904HF  L0101

Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores themes in fundamental moral theology that are required for an understanding of the moral subject and contemporary moral issues. Topics include: a review of key ethical methodologies; the formation and role of conscience and ethical norms; the role of freedom, responsibility, the Christian community and magisterial teaching, virtue, and sin and conversion. Format: lecture and discussions. Evaluation: participation, short papers.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT1905HF  L0101

Ethical Reflections on Pastoral Practice

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Basic principles of Christian ethics, with special attention to the pastoral application of moral theology. Case-study method used. Designed for Regis IFM students. Readings, lectures, seminar work, 3 short essays, final exam. Seminar work requires an additional one-hour commitment per week.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
SAT1905HY  L0101

Moral Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Introduction to Catholic moral theology: scripture, tradition, natural law, faith & morality; moral norms & virtue; conscience & magisterium. Readings, lectures, discussions, short reflection papers, exam. This course is part of the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is part of the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's. See listing in Summer 2014 term for our regularly scheduled course.
WYT1911HS  L0101

Gift and Call: Discerning Divine Direction in Modern Life

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The notion that God “calls” a whole people (like Jews) to do work in the world – as well as the ideal that this can and sometimes does apply also to individuals – is unavoidable in Christianity.  Yet it subject to facile interpretations, especially in a modern world hungry for meaningful personal narratives.  The class will examine “call”, beginning with biblical materials, and extending forward to today.  Modern notions of “work” will be critiqued in the light of older Jewish and Christians commitment to work and rest, a rest which acknowledges gift.  Students will be challenged to discern call in connect both to their membership among a whole people, and to their specific end or beatitude in God.

Schedule: Saturday, 09:00 to 16:00 · Begins: 01/11 · Ends: 03/29
Schedule Notes: January 25, February 15, March 08 & March 29, 2014  Final Paper due by April 11
Instructors: Charles R. Pinches
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
WYT2101HS  L0101

The Bride of the Lamb: Systematic Theology II

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the activity of God from creation to new creation, with special emphasis on the Spirit's work in the Church. We also examine the image of God in the human person and the nature of sin. This course presupposes Systematic Theology I. Lectures, tutorials. Short papers, final exam. Tutorial 10-11 am

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Biblical
WYT2101HF  L6101

The Bride of the Lamb: Systematic Theology II

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Online Course

This course explores the activity of God from creation to new creation, with special emphasis on the Spirit's work in the Church. We also examine the image of God in the human person and the nature of sin. This course presupposes Systematic Theology I.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
EMT2102HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/04/01

Theology II

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of formative and alternative theologies of redemption from Christianity's early years through the twentieth century, focusing on how theologians have variously conceived the problem to which redemption is addressed, the work and person of Jesus Christ, and the roles of God and humanity in effecting redemption. Theologians considered may include Irenaeus, Athanasius, Augustine, Calvin, Bushnell, Maurice, Niebuhr, Cone, Soelle, Heyward, and Ruether. Lectures, reading, discussions, presentation and final paper. Prerequisite: one introductory course in systematic theology.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2222HS  L0101

Mystery of the Trinity

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of the Triune God with its Biblical sources and Patristic development, and an examination of the development of the understanding of the Immanent Trinity, with attention paid to particular issues, e.g. Filioque, notion of 'Person'. Also stressed is the development of a Trinitarian spirituality with some attention to the mystics. Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2222HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/04/02

God One and Triune

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close textual study of the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the church's reflection on the identity of the God who is revealed in Jesus the Christ. Students develop a systemic understanding of this material, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the tradition in light of preparation for pastoral and theological leadership in the Church. Assignments: exegetical paper, 3 learning reports, take home final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2223HS  L6101

The Christian God

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2010 · Online Course

This course considers basic themes in the theology of the Holy Trinity from a biblical, historical and systematic viewpoint and addresses selected contemporary questions about the mystery of the tri-personal God.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Peter Gittens
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
SMT2223HS  L0101

Mystery of the Triune God

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer. Lectures, discussions, short paper, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2242HF  L0101

Christology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam. This course is part of the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Limited to the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's.  See listing in Winter term for our regularly scheduled course.
SAT2242HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT2242HF  L0101

Christology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Systematic and pastoral approach to christology and soteriology. Emphasis on New Testament christologies, later developments, contemporary interpretations. Study of the impact on christology of such issues as the continuing quest for the historical Jesus, dialogue with other religions, and in particular with Judaism, the challenge of liberation and feminist theologies, and the new cosmology. Seminar participation, short paper, take-home exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
SAT2321HF  L0101

Creation/Anthropology/Sin

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of creation. The human person in its created existence in the image of Christ; origin of humankind. Doctrine of original sin. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT2321HS  L0101

Creation, Man/Woman, Sin

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Christian doctrine of creation; its scriptural foundation in Old and New Testaments; its difference from Greek philosophical theories; its history to present; its relation to evolution; contemporary theories. Man/woman: their nature and relationship to God and the world as understood in history of Christian thought. Monogenism vs. polygenism. The problem of evil, original sin and sin of the world. Lectures and discussion. Paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
SMT2328HF  L0101

Creation, Fall, Grace and Glory

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Christian anthropology, focussing on theology of creation, human nature, the fall and original sin, transformation by grace, eschatological call to glory. Biblical, historical, liturgical, and contemporary theological reflection, emphasis on contemporary reinterpretation of creation theology, problem of evil, and grace. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
SAT2331HS  L0101

Grace and Glory

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The new creation in Christ; God's universal salvific will, the mystery of Christian Justification, the new life in Christ within Church for the world. Eschatology. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2401HY  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. This course is part of the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert J. Barringer CSB
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Limited to Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's. See listing in Winter term for our regularly scheduled course.
SAT2401HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
SMT2402HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/01/06

Introduction to Liturgy

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is an introduction to the history, theology and pastoral practice of Christian liturgy. Topics include: the role of ritual and symbol in human life, the historical development of Christian worship in both East and West, the relationship of liturgy to society and culture, liturgical theology, and critical approaches to liturgical practice. Lectures, readings, discussions, online postings, class presentation, research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Christian McConnell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT2431HF  L0101

Church Ministry Sacraments: Presbyterian and Reformed Views

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A theological exploration of Church, Ministry and Sacraments from a Presbyterian perspective in dialogue with other traditions and contemporary expressions of the Christian movement. Assignment and Paper. Prerequisites: A basic introductory theology course. Knox M.Div. students need to have Ref. Theology in Dialogue.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2431HF  L0101

Sacramental Theology I

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to sacraments in general, historical and systematic study of sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2432HS  L0101

Sacramental Theology II

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical and systematic study of the sacraments of healing (penance and anointing of the sick) and sacraments of growth (marriage and orders) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT2433HF  L0101

Sacramental Life

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Biblical, historical, systematic, and pastoral study of sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and vocation). Readings, lectures, discussions, weekly assignments, short papers or research paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2433HS  L0101

Sacraments

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Theological reflection on the sacramental life of the Church in the context or worship and education in sacramentality. This course is part of the Diaconate Formation Diploma program at St. Augustine's.

Schedule: Sunday, Saturday
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
SAT2433HF  L6101

Sacraments

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Online Course

Theological reflection on the sacramental life of the Church in the context or worship and education in sacramentality. Lectures, course notes supplied and class discussions. Group presentations, mid-term test and final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Donald Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
WYT2502HF  L6101

Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Online Course

A study of Anglican Theology, principally through the reading of texts from Anglican thinkers of the 16th and 17th centuries. Study and discussion of the foundational themes of the English Reformation, as well as the 17th century development. The two great renewal movements of the 18th and 19th centuries: the evangelical movement and the Anglo-Catholic movement. The modern criticisms of the Anglican tradition. The question of Anglican identity and authority.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Smith
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Historical
TRT2504HF  L0101

Early Fathers/Mothers: Eastern Thought, Doctrine and Theology to 431

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the primary texts of the Church's first five centuries from the perspective of Eastern Christians, to identify and apply the vision of God and persons forged by the early doctors of the Church. Close readings of primary texts. Research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Maria-Fotini Polidoulis-Kapsalis
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 3
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
WYT2505HF  L4101

Introduction to Anglican Theology: Ways of Reading the Bible in the English Church and Anglican Communion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Canada - other Site

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with a broad range of styles, perspectives, and periods of Anglican theology, mainly within England, from the 16th to the 21st centuries. The Creeds (mostly the Apostles’) will be viewed through a variety of lenses, and the readings will all represent approaches and interpretations of aspects of the Creed from within the Anglican tradition, using primary source material.

Lectures on the primary-source readings. Weekly content quizzes; midterm; final exam.

Schedule: Irregular · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Ephraim Radner, David Widdicombe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is offered in Winnipeg and for registration please contact the Wycliffe College Registrar's Office
WYT2505HS  L0101

Introduction to Anglican Theology: Ways of Reading the Bible in the English Church and Anglican Communion

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a survey course in Anglican theology that will involve extensive reading. Using the lens of Scriptural interpretation as a way of approaching the sweep of Anglican theological thinking, this course will survey chronologically a broad range Anglican readers of Scripture in an attempt to gauge the development of the larger religious vision of Anglicanism over time. Beginning with Wycliffe, the course will move through a number of writers into the early 20th century, and end with some recent statements on the reading of Scripture from around the Anglican Communion. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source readings. Weekly content quizzes; midterm; final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT2571HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/04/01

Theology and Evangelism in the Wesleyan Heritage

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

By examining major elements of John Wesley theology in his sermons, journals and diaries, this course will explore the heritages of Wesley theology within the tradition of Reformation theology and recognize the contribution of Wesleyan theology to the development of theology in general. Because Wesley attempted, about 200 years later after Luther and Calvin, to revitalize Reformation theology and overcome its limits in various contexts, both Wesleyan and non-Wesleyan (especially Calvinist) students will have a chance to learn and exercise the traditional theology in the present post-modern world. The course will be in seminar format with lecture input, analysis of readings, student presentation and class discussion. Attention is given to the nuances of the denominations represented by those who enrolled in the course.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Chun Hoi Heo
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2601HS  L4101

Ecumenism

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Explores historical sources of division among Christian churches, origins of the modern ecumenical movement, the commitment of the Roman Catholic Church to Christian unity, growing agreement in sacramental life. Special attention to implications for catechesis and pastoral care of inter-church families.

Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 to 16:00
Schedule Notes: January 11, February 8, March 1 and March 29
Instructors: Damian MacPherson, Robert J. Barringer CSB
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
KNT2608HF  L0101

Theology of Religions

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore major approaches to the relationship between the Christian faith and other religions in the context of the plurality and diversity of the contemporary world. Evaluation: paper/assignment. Prerequisite: A basic introductory theology course

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRT2613HF  L0101

A Theology of the City

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The city is both a geographical concentration of human habitation, culture, commerce and built environment and symbol rich in biblical resonance. Deeply ambiguous, the city holds both profound creative and redemptive potential and can be the symbol of what is most profoundly wrong with culture forming. In this course we will develop a theology of the city through biblical reflection and exegesis. Through interdisciplinary reading and reflection, together with on-the-street engagement, we will lay the foundations for an integral and transformative urban ministry.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: CRC Wycliffe
TRT2621HS  L0101

Christian Missiology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Christian missiology including the biblical basis of Christian mission and cross-cultural mission and ministry; theology of mission; Christianity and culture; history of Christian mission; global Christianity and mission today; mission, evangelism and other faiths; mission globalization and the electronic media; mission and justice, peace, reconciliation and the environment; mission and personhood; Christian anthropology and the anthropology of Christianity; and the future of Christian mission.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Terry M. Brown
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
WYT2637HF  L0101

Engaging Islam in the 21st Century

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is for Christian theology students who wish to have a basic knowledge of the religion of Islam. Two basic questions are attempted in the course: "What is Islam?" and How do I engage the Muslim?". These two questions will underline the lectures and discussions.

Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 to 15:00
Schedule Notes: Saturday September 21, 28, October 5, plus two trips TBC
Instructors: Josiah Idowu-Fearon
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Withdrawal Deadline:
SAT2701HS  L0101

Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of some of the main themes in philosophy of religion including: faith and reason, religious experience, divine attributes, the problem of evil, petitionary prayer, miracles, and religious diversity. Lectures and discussion; short papers and essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
SAT2705HF  L0101

Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course, we will examine different theories of human nature. We will be guided by two focusing questions: 'What makes me happy?' and 'What keeps me from being happy?'. We will address these questions on both individual and communal levels. Students will constantly be encouraged to connect the theories discussed in class with their own experience. Lectures, discussion, and short papers.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
SAT2707HS  L0101

Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of three different approaches to ethics. First, we will look at the foundations of Western morality through reading Plato's Gorgias; second, at Nietzsche's attack on Western morality in Beyond Good & Evil; and third at Aquinas' treatment of the virtues. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2715HF  L0101

Introduction to Epistemology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course, we will look at some of the central problems of epistemology: What is knowledge? How do we get it? Exactly what do we know, anyway? How does knowledge differ from belief? And how do we respond to the challenges of scepticism and post-modernism? After starting with a historical survey of the answers to these questions, we will examine the answers proposed by the Jesuit theologian Bernard Lonergan.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
SAT2723HF  L0101

Early Western Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A focused study of philosophers and representative texts in the early western philosophical tradition covering metaphysics, theory of knowledge, human nature, and ethics. Historical development of ideas from the pre-Socratics to Boethius. Lectures and discussion; short papers and essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT2726HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/30

God, History and Human Nature in the 19th Century

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the 17th century, the thinkers of the Scientific Revolution were looking for explanations of the physical world that were valid everywhere and for all time. In the 18th century, Enlightenment thinkers were also looking for universally valid explanations but for human nature, morality and society. That all changed in the 19th century when thinkers realized that the contingency and mutability of existence make once-and-for-all answers impossible. Come find out how Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche and Freud changed the way we look at the world forever. We will consider the thinkers ideas both in their historical context and in light of their implications for our own thinking about human nature, society, history, morality and God. Lectures, discussions, on-line questions. Two 6-8 page papers; class participation; on-line questions; final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
TRT2802HS  L0101

Beyond Homelessness

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the nature of postmodern homelessness in the light of a theological and phenomenological analysis of homecoming and homemaking. Biblical themes such as creation, exodus, covenant, land and kingdom will be interpreted in the context of present experiences of social homelessness, geo-political violence, international refugees, disconnectedness to the earth and an overwhelming sense of being nomads without roots in any place of community. Seminar. Evaluation: Class Participation 25%, reflection papers or one major essay 75%.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: CRC Wycliffe
RGT2810HS  L0101

Pastoral Competency

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of the moral, pastoral and canonical principles of sound ministerial practice in the Roman Catholic tradition, along with an intensive practicum. Online component, lecture, discussion, tutoring. For lay students and ordination candidates in the M.Div. program at Regis College only. Oral Examination for pass/fail credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Regis College M.Div. Director.

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9:00 to 15:00
Schedule Notes: Apr 12 (S), 14-17 (M-R), 21-22 (M-T) 2014
Instructors: Gordon Rixon
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
Enrollment Notes: Max 12
TRT2811HS  L4101

Radical Hospitality: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Practices

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (other off-campus location) Site

This course will introduce students to three dimensions of hospitality, with the aim of having students construct their own theology of radical hospitality.

  1. The phenomenon of hospitality: something of its history, theology, and practice in the Christian tradition.
  2. The concept of hospitality: attending to some of the 20th century philosophical reflections on the theme.
  3. The concrete practice of hospitality as it is described by guest lecturers and experienced in a pre-arranged hospitality practicum.

Sessions will alternate between guest lectures and seminar-style discussions. Students will participate in, and write a reflection paper on, a hospitality practicum, review one contemporary theology of hospitality, and write one research paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Jason McKinney
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Off-campus location: Church of Epiphany & St. Mark, 201 Cowan Ave, Parkdale.
EMT2811HF  L0101

Women, Gender and Islam

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Some of the most debated topics in contemporary Islam revolve around the notion of gender and women's rights. This course is a historical and topical survey of the role of women and gender in the Islamic faith tradition. The first half of the course will review the history of women in Islamic societies, while the second will address some of the most prominent issues in contemporary discourses. Topics will include marriage, divorce, veiling, segregation, leadership, Islamic feminism and hermeneutics.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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EMT2812HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/11/06

Qur'an II: Islamic Thought and the Bible

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Bible and the Qur'an share many stories with common characters, such as Adam, Abraham, and Saul. Although there is some overlapping between the Bible and Quranic accounts, they demonstrate profound differences, which scholars have read in diverse ways across the ages. This course will explore the various ways this nexus has been treated in both western and traditional Muslim scholarship and how developments in literary theory can shed light on how the relationship between the texts is read. Seminars, short lectures, readings. Reflection/reading response papers:45%; Class participation: 10%

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT2871HS  L0101

Science & Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Will identify and deal with a complex set of issues involved in the relationship of the sciences -- natural, biological, and social -- to religion and theology. Particular attention will be given to methodological and epistemological matters. Assigned reading for class discussion and two short reports/papers related to lectures and class discussions.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRT2876HF  L0101

Film, Prophecy and Culture

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Humans are story-telling animals. We find our identity, our memory, our vision and our meaning through the narratives of our lives. While the church has been a foundational story telling institution in our lives, it has clearly been eclipsed in the last half century by various forms of mass media, and most notably through cinema. In this course we will use the Toronto International Film Festival as our classroom. Engaging in a two way dialogue between film and Christian theology, students will develop a biblically theological understanding of contemporary film. We will explore the prophetic, pastoral, liturgical and theological contribution that contemporary cinema can make to Christian reflection and praxis in a late modern socio-historical context.

Sherry Coman is co-teaching this course with Brian Walsh.

Schedule: Irregular · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: Course runs during the Toronto International Film Festival.
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
Enrollment Notes: Enrollment deadline: September 3

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EMT2902HF  L0101

Christian Ethics in Context

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This orientation to several dimensions of Christian ethics - language, sources, norms, methods and concerns - aims to foster ethical awareness for dealing with moral challenges in personal, social, and church/religious life.  To practice Canadian ethical reflection, these dimensions are introduced with reference to several concrete social issues and the public vocation of Christian ethics.  Lectures, case studies, conversations; 3 essays (on moral formation; a text engagement paper, and a final paper on a mentor in Christian ethics, on professional ministry ethics, or on wealth and property). Prerequisites: basic Bible and theology.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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TRT2942HF  L0101

Ethics and Society

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The primary goal of this course is to help us think critically and sensitively about Christian values, norms, and commitments in ways that preserve a Christian orientation while taking into account the non-Christian and pluralistic context of modern society. Such thinking will involve a dialectical process where universal principles, values, and norms will be examined with reference to the particular experiences and realities that constrain human action and interaction. The aim is not to structure a strict formalistic ethical framework but rather to canvall various ethical methodologies, religious and secular, as resources for ethical thinking and praxis. Method of Evaluation: Critical book response(s), one term paper; class participation.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
KNT2964HF  L0101

Christian Ethics for Biosphere and Context

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines various theoretical and practical ethical issues that Christians face in today's changing society, with special emphases on multicultural reality in Canada and the global ecological crisis today. The course consists of four parts: the theoretical foundation for Christian ethical thinking (part 1), social justice issues in Canadian multi-cultural multi-ethnic, and multi-religious society (part 2), ecological crisis and the church's response (part 3), integration (part 4). Lecture and seminar. Minor and major papers, short weekly reading report and group discussion report, and one seminar presentation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Bryan Jeongguk Lee
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
3000 Level Courses
EMT3020HS  L0101

Interwined Texts: Bible and Qur'an in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Interfaith dialogue has many avenues, of which reading each other’s sacred texts is one of the most conducive to building understanding.  The scriptures of Islam, Judaism and Christianity are particularly suited to this venture, because of the shared narratives, which demonstrate both commonalities and profound differences.   This course focuses on narratives shared between the Bible and the Quran and how major Muslim, Christian, and Jewish scholars have approached the relationship between the texts across the ages. The course examines scholars such as Tabari (d. 923), Ibn Kathir (d. 1373), Abraham Geiger (d. 1874), W. St. Clair Tisdall (d.1929), Angelika Neuwirth and others.  Students will learn the difference between author- and reader-oriented approaches, influence theory and intertextuality, and how different presuppositions can impact how the texts and their relationship are read.  Students will also have the opportunity to engage in scripture-based interfaith dialogue and to experience first-hand how some of the established and developing approaches are practiced.

AD students enrol in EMT6020HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda El-Tahry
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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RGT3115HF  L0101

Vatican II: The Theology and Historical Context of the Documents

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will study the documents of the Second Vatican Council with a view to understanding their theological foundations, their historical context and development, and their pastoral implications for today's church. One book report, total 20%; one discussion facilitation, total 10%; one document analysis paper, total 30%; one disputed issue paper, total 40%.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Historical
Enrollment Notes: Max 24
SAT3181HF  L0101

Theological Integration

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

For final year students, a comprehensive and synthetic review of Roman Catholic doctrine in Systematic Theology. Personal appropriation of the mysteries of faith as well as effective pastoral explanation and communication of these mysteries is also stressed. Seminar presentations and final oral exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
KNT3271HS  L0101

Doctrines of Reconciliation

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Critical assessment of the most important and formative theories on the Christian doctrine of reconciliation with particular reference to those that have shaped reformed perspectives. Lectures and group discussion. Evaluation by essay. Prerequisites: A basic introductory theology course plus another theology course. Knox students should have completed Church, Ministry, Sacraments.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3320HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/17

Doing Justice with Spirit

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological perspectives and spiritual practices for integrating faith and the work for justice, peace and a healthy environment. Evaluation by essay.

AD students enrol in RGT6320HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGT3322HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/05

Contemplation in Action

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Ignatius of Loyola wanted Jesuits to be "contemplatives in action". This describes the desire of many Christians today and the imperatives thrust upon us to be at once boned with God and with our fellow travellers. Reading in Loyola Zizioulas, J Macmurray, early Christian and contemporary theologians and mystics. NT accounts of prayer and action in Jesus of Nazareth. 10-12 page essay.

AD students enrol in RGT6322HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGT3333HS  L0101

Transformative Dynamics of Grace

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Participants explore the biblical sources, historical development, systematic elaboration, ecumenical context and transformative social implications of the doctrine of grace. Written assignments are varied in order to help participants sort out the different tasks involved in doing theology and progress toward a final synthetic case study. 3000 Level: lectures, quizzes, short papers. 6000 Level: lectures, seminar, book review, research paper.

AD students enrol in RGT6333HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jeremy Wilkins
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
ICT3352HF  L0101

Facing the Darkness: The (Human) Nature of Evil

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2004 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

We shall discuss the origin and nature of evil by engaging various biblical, theological, and anthropological resources. Topics will include lament literature (e.g. Job), natural evil, idolatry and the demonic, original sin and the correlation between victim and agent, and the relationship between justice and mercy. The course will consist of seminars in which participants will engage key readings relevant to the practice of interdisciplinary theology.

AD students enrol in ICT6352HF.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT3370HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/10

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practical integration

AD students enrol in SMT6370HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
RGT3410HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will provide an introduction to the theology of the Church and the Church

AD students enrol in RGT6410HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
EMT3412HF  L0101

Confessing Our Faith

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Through analysis of doctrinal statements of The United Church of Canada, their historical origins and contemporary theology, this course will enable students to become acquainted with United Church theology and the processes by which it has been developed, and to articulate their own faith in relation to their own experience, the faith of the church, and the practice of ministry in the context of challenges of today. Students will participate in the process by which "Christians of each new generation are called to state [the faith of the church] afresh in terms of the thought of their own age and with the emphasis their age needs" (Preamble, A Statement of Faith, 1940). Doctrinal statements on which the course will focus include the Doctrine section of the Basis of Union (1925), A Statement of Faith I1940), and A Song of Faith (2006); theological statements from other United Church documents will also be considered. Course methods include readings, discussions, and papers, and will incorporate students' reflections on their experience and integration of theory and practice into discussions and papers. Regular attendance and participation required.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:30 to 19:30
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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RGT3436HS  L0101

Sacremental Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, reconciliation, anointing of the sick, orders, and marriage as symbols of the world, challenge to human existence, life functions of the Church and features of Christology and revelation. Lectures, seminars, mid-term papers and final paper. Short paper on Symbol and Sacrament, total 20%; four short papers on one of the sacraments, 10% each (total 40%); three case study critiques for in-class discussion, total 10%; one final paper, total 30%.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
EMT3451HF  L0101

Mission and Religious Pluralism

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Taking into account recent paradigm shifts in the theology of mission, this course invites participants to consider the relationship of mission to biblical sources, culture and context, unity and diversity in the church, post-colonism and intercultural engagement, and especially religious pluralism. The goal is to foster critical theological reflection on how the church might best understand and embody its mission in a multifaceted and globalizing world situation today. Methodology: lectures/discussions. Evaluations are based upon a mid-term paper, final research paper, and class participation. Prerequisite: Completion of first credit group or Level II.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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SAT3471HS  L0101

Mariology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

The Christological-Trinitarian foundation of Mary's role in salvation history and in the Church is developed in two areas: 1) the foundations from Vatican II, Scripture, Church Fathers, and the four Marian Dogmas; 2) the celebration of Mary in liturgy, popular piety, and spirituality. Finally, Mary is studied in light of ecumenism, and in one contemporary theologian and twentieth-century developments for her profound significance for today. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination. The course is held at 2661 Kingston Road location.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
KNT3501HF  L0101

Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a close reading of the English text of Calvin's "Institution Christianae religions" of 1559. We begin by situating Calvin's theology in the historical and theological context of the 16th century Reformation before turning to a careful examination of the "Institutes'" major doctrinal themes and their significance both for Calvin's context and the subsequent history of Protestant theology. Seminar style. weekly readings and reflections; major paper.

AD students enrol in KNT6501HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John A. Vissers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRT3501HF  L0101

Theology of Martin Luther

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course probes Luther's understanding of major Christian doctrines. Theological ferment in the Sixteenth Century will be examined in every class, including Luther's (theological) relationship to other Magisterial Reformers, Radical Reformers, and Roman-Catholic/ Counter-Reformation Reformers. Attention will also be paid to such matters as the extent to which the Magisterial Reformation was an aspect of Renaissance Humanism or a departure from it, and the (putative) anti-Semitism of Luther and its relation to more recent manifestations of anti- Semitism. Weekly readings, lectures, and classroom discussions. Essay (50%) and final examination (50%).

AD students enrol in TRT6501HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Victor A. Shepherd
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
WYT3510HF  L0101

The Sin Seminar: Engaging Hamartiology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Doctrine of Sin has suffered several critiques in recent times, and yet we live in an era aware of structural injustices and horrendous evil. This course will consider the major approaches to the doctrine in the tradition, the insights available in art and literature, and what a reconstruction of the doctrine might look like. Relations to contemporary subjects like psychotherapy and brain science will also be considered.

AD students enrol in WYT6510HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: George R. Sumner
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3530HF  L0101

Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Overview and critical survey of the main elements of Bernard Lonergan's thought emphasizing his contribution as a significant Canadian thinker and the Thomistic and Ignatian context of this thought. We will emphasize Lonergan's philosophy of intentional consciousness, its basis for philosophical and theological method, the application of his method to select topics in systemic theology, social development, and post-humous developments of this thought.

AD students enrol in RGT6530HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
TRT3566HF  L6101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

AD students enrol in TRT6566HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRT3566HF  L0101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

AD students enrol in TRT6566HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRT3566HS  L6101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT3585HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/03/26

The Theology of Jurgen Moltmann

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore the major theological themes addressed by Jurgen Moltmann in relation to the traditions of Reformed Theology. Students will read key works of the author, engage in seminar presentations, and will do a research paper on an aspect of Moltmann's theology.

AD students enrol in KNT6585HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT3604HS  L0101

Becoming Intercultural Communities

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will develop knowledge and practice skills for intercultural life and leadership in heterogeneous publics. We will draw on interdisciplinary, intercultural materials, including: critical social and cultural theories, formation of complex identities at intersections of structures of social markers; scriptural, theological and ethical attention to difference and similarity; worship and educational resources; and the case of the United Church of Canada project "Becoming an Intercultural Church" as a vision and practice to live out its commitment to racial and social justice. (Qualifies as a designated elective in theology or ethics.) Seminar format with instructional input, small groups, modest cross-cultural immersion project. Evaluation: a book review (30%); a class presentation (30%), and a final integrative project (40%). Prerequisites: basic course in bible and theology.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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SMT3605HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/06

Comparative Theology Seminar

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to comparative theology and comparative theologies, with special attention to their close interrelation and emergence with comparative religion and religious studies in the modern period. Our study will begin with a genealogical examination of the early modern discipline of "comparative theology", a liberal Christian project designed to overcome the prejudices and limitations of "dogmatic theology" through its engagement with the claims of other religious traditions. In a second major unit of the course, we will examine the mutual self-definition of neo-Orthodox theology and the field of comparative religious studies in the mid-twentieth centuries including the efforts to build bridges between these disciplines by prominent theologians in North America. Finally, we will turn our attention to contemporary critiques of comparative religion itself and the emergence of a "new" comparative theology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

AD students enrol in SMT6605HS.

Schedule: Friday, 10:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Reid B. Locklin
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 8
Enrollment Notes: AD:4, BD:4
CGT3621HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/11/13

Theologizing in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a survey of defining theological, ethical and spiritual writings in sixteenth century Anabaptism and its descendent movements, especially Mennonites. It offers an understanding of the religious and cultural forces that have shaped this tradition. It focuses especially on the flowering of North American Mennonite theology throughout the twentieth century and of global Mennonite theology after 1975. The course will proceed in a modified seminar format with an introductory lecture to each day's topic.

AD students enrol in CGT6621HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:00 to 11:00
Schedule Notes: Toronto School of Theology, 47 Queen's Park Cresent East.  Seminar Room
Instructors: John D. Rempel
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 15
SAT3643HS  L0101

Theology of Religions and Interfaith Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces the major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam in detail and also others in brief) of the world -- their historical setting, basic principles, significant features, Holy Scriptures, theology, etc. -- and a Christian perspective on them with an urgency to enter into interfaith dialogue and peaceful coexistence.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephrem Nariculam
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
WYT3651HF  L0101

Theologies of Luther & Calvin

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course of lectures will examine Luther's writings on the theology of the cross and on human freedom; and Calvin's writings on Scripture and the Christian life. Weekly readings and final examination (oral or written).

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SMT3652HS  L0101

An Introduction to Eco-Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Using the writings of Thomas Berry & theologians who work with the new cosmology, the course provides an introduction to eco-theology as well as the ways eco-theologians are articulating new understandings of theological anthropology, revelation, Christology, pneumatology, sin and salvation, and eschatology. Adult learning methods. Evaluation: participation, practical integration, reflection paper and integration paper.

AD students enrol in SMT6652HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20
SMT3670HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/07

Vatican II: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962)-1965) and their contemporary significance for students of ministry. Emphasis is on the historical context, the central theological content of each of the texts, and their relevance to professional ministry today. The course will consist of: weekly readings, seminar presentation on each of the documents, and focused in-class discussion,. Students will be evaluated on class participation as well as three smaller assignments; a background; an in-depth; and a pastoral, integrative final assignment , all of which are intended to assist students in exploring more deeply their own interest in the Council

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
EMT3672HF  L0101

Theology, Violence, and Peace

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores theological reflection in relation to violence and peace, particularly in Christian traditions. Theories of violence and non-violence as well as case studies from the past and present will provide the means to investigate the ways faith-based claims justify or promote enmity and hostility and/or hospitality and peacemaking in Christian practice. Attention may be given to violence/peace in connection with theologies of revelation and atonement; justice/love; gender, race, ethnicity, class, and disability; Empire and globalization processes; interfaith relations with Jewish, Muslim, and Canadian Aboriginal communities; and the possibility of forgiveness and reconciliation. Lectures, discussions, journal exercises, book review, presentation, and final research paper.

AD students enrol in EMT6672HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24

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TRT3675YY  L0101

Orthodox Life: Eastern Christian Understanding of Ethics, Society and the World

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Eastern Christian thought has always been deeply concerned with ethical-social issues of the daily encounter with life and culture, but Christian Orthodoxy grounds solutions to these issues in tradition, not "progress". How should modern Orthodoxy respond to civil rights, war, sexuality, bioethics, multiculturalism, environmentalism, women's ministries, etc.?

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Other Information: Full Year · Two Credits
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340 This course was previously offered in summer 2012 as a one credit course.

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WYT3682HS  L0101

Human Sexuality in a Christian Perspective

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine human sexuality from a range of theological and historical perspectives: scriptural, doctrinal, sociological, and ethical. Questions of sexual differentiation, desire, procreation, family, and marriage and celibacy will be discussed. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a broad base from which to discern a consistent pattern of Christian understanding regarding sexuality, within both historical and contemporary diversities. The course will engage broad reading, lecture, and discussion, with a final paper aimed at outlining and justifying a teaching syllabus for teenagers within a church setting (15 pages). Advanced Degree students will have an expanded reading list and will be writing a longer research paper on a chosen set topic relating to Christian formation with regard to sexuality within pluralistic cultures.

AD students enrol in WYT6682HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3702HF  L0101

Religion, Life and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the Amsterdam School of neoCalvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and in other schools of thought.

AD students enrol in ICT6702HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT3711HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/05

Challenging the Matrix

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

What does technology have to do with theology? Technological developments have challenged our views about what it means to be real, to be good, and even to be human - all prime theological ground. Today we do not simply live with technology, we live 'in' it. While society wrestles with the ethical implications of particular technologies, Christian philosophers, social critics , and theologians have taken a leading role in discussions about the nature of technology itself. They have expanded our idea of what technology is and how it shapes our daily lives and our future. In this course we will survey some of their most important theologically informed ideas. We will also apply them critically to our technological society, which the church itself both inhabits and seeks to engage.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Samantha E. Thompson
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3716HF  L0101

Wittgenstein: Language & the Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Wittgenstein's philosophy continues to generate enormous interest, and his name is frequently cited in connection with radical developments in theology and the philosophy of religion. Via an exploration of the different accounts of language and meaning he presents in both his early and later work, this course will focus on his thought as it relates to religious belief and commitment in particular.

AD students enrol in ICT6716HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3720HF  L0101

Language, Culture and Religious Belief

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Religious belief is linguistically and culturally determined. Specific 'language use' is the particular means of appropriating and forming religious consciousness. There is this a linguistic bias in every religious belief system. This course relies on the linguistic philosophical writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein, especially his exposition of language-games, family resemblances, rule-following, and forms of life, in order to explore the linguistic and cultural determination of religious belief.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
Enrollment Notes: Pre-Requisite: two courses in philosophy.
ICT3732HS  L0101

Ricoeur: Language & the Sacred

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will focus on two of Ricoeur?s essay collections, From Text to Action and Figuring the Sacred. Students will explore the general shape of Ricoeur?s hermeneutical phenomenology, including such themes as textual interpretation, action, explanation, understanding, ideology, and utopia.

AD students enrol in ICT6732HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3753HS  L0101

The Nature (and Grace) of Modern Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the work of seminal Protestant and Catholic theologians associated with the re-shaping of 'modern' theology in the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the 'nature-grace' relationship - understood as the distinction and connection that theologians posit or discern between 'divine' and 'human' power, freedom, and desire. The famous debate between Karl Barth and Emil Brunner (Natural Theology, ET, 1948) , and the more recent discussions of Leonardo Boff (Liberating Grace, ET, 1979) and Stephen Duffy (The Graced Horizon: Nature and Grace in Modern Catholic Thought, 1992) will stimulate our contemporary reflections on the 'covenantal' nature of reality and the spirituality of existence. Participants will engage key reading s in a seminar setting.

AD students enrol in ICT6753HS.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3761HF  L0101

Theories of Language and Interpretation: Gadamer, Kristeva, and Searle

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The linguistic turn and the interpretive turn in twentieth-century philosophy play a role in many cultural controversies and academic debates. This seminar examines representative texts from three schools of thought: German philosophical hermeneutics (Hans-Georg Gadamer), French poststructural feminism (Julia Kristeva), and Anglo-American analytical philosophy of language (John Searle).

AD students enrol in ICT6761HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3776HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/18

Feminist Social Thought

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore current contributions to the field of feminist social thought. We will read from figures such as Gloria Anzaldu, Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, Nancy Fraser, and Chandra Mohanty on various ways of understanding the relationships between gendered identities and sociopolitical states of affairs.

AD students enrol in ICT6776HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3778HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/18

Body, Language, Power: The Question of the Human in 20th Century French Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The goal of the course is to study significant accounts of the nature of human beings in 20th-century French continental philosophy. It will begin by investigating the existential-phenomenological conceptions of human nature developed by Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Persons, on such accounts, should be understood as being in the world, as embodied, as essentially defined by relations to others and relations of language, and as characterized by existential problems of anxiety and authenticity. We will then take up the development and transformation of this story in Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, and Michel Foucault, who oppose to the humanist model of the well-formed and autonomous individual the model of persons as dispersed into networks of language and power.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3782HF  L6101

Creative Communication: Culture, Art and Politics

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

Everyone participates in the arts and culture, but who can say why? This course asks why the arts are important and addresses issues that face contemporary creators and interpreters of culture. Our aim is to develop imaginative, faith-oriented participation in the arts and culture. We will consider such topics as artistic freedom and social responsibility; communication through the arts and culture; the impact of globalization on cultural communities; the ethics of mass entertainment; the aesthetic quality of urban environments; and the role of arts in worship and interreligious dialogue. In addition to class sessions, we will attend various events in the city. Lecture, discussion, class presentations, attendance of public events, paper writing. Class participation: 20% / Seminar presentations: 30% / Research project: 50%.

AD students enrol in ICT6782HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3783HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/18

Person, Family and Society

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will reflect on the nature of the social world in a way that emerges from and is integrally linked with Christian faith. Challenging the common view that individuals are fully independent and self-made, we will look at the different kinds of communities that define us, in both restrictive and enabling ways: family, political society, religious community, and groups formed on the basis of other kinds of shared identities. We will look at the way in which we emerge as individuals only through these primary identifications, and at the conflicted way in which our individuality is essentially an attempt to understand and even overcome them. We will also explore the tensions that arise between these various communities and the claims upon us?between family and social membership, between religious community and political membership, between formal legal identity and concrete group identification, and so on. The course includes readings from diverse philosophical, religious, literary, and social-scientific texts. It aims to develop an existentially and philosophically rich Christian sensitivity to the complexity of social relationships that shape us and make claims on us.

AD students enrol in ICT6783HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3790YY  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Instructors:
Other Information: Full Year · Two Credits
RGT3790YS  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · Two Credits
RGT3790YF  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · Two Credits
RGT3809HF  L0101

Doing Theology in the Canadian Context

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of doing theology in the Canadian Context. Using a multidisciplinary approach (literary, social, political and economic) the course will examine how this particular context affects how we think, pray and act as Christians.
Evaluation for BD: Class participation and 2 papers (10 pages each).
Evaluation for AD:  Class participation and major paper.

AD students enrol in RGT6809HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Mary Jo Leddy
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
Additional Notes: This course previously had the title "God & Caesar at the 49th"
WYT3824HS  L0101

Music Prophecy & Culture

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

While theology has always found a fruitful dialogue partner in the arts, the course will approach the world of contemporary music in genres as diverse as rock, bluegrass, hip hop, folk and alternative rock as theological resources in their own right. Attending to the interweaving of biblical iconography, symbols, narratives, motifs and themes in the lyrics of these artists, we will explore the prophetic, pastoral, liturgical and theological contribution that they make for Christian reflection and praxis in a late modern socio-historical context. There will also be focussed attention on the artistry of Canadian singer/songwriter Bruce Cockburn. Seminar. Evaluation: class participation 25%, reflection papers or one major essay 75%.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
SAT3850HS  L6101

Christianity & World Religions

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

This class will introduce students to a number of religious traditions in their classical formulations and their contemporary practices. Students will also explore the academic study of religion, considering how various disciplines approach the myths, stories, symbols, rituals, ideas, and ethical practices of these religions. This introduction will provide students a framework within which to reflect on their own experiences, as well as prepare them for further academic study in both the humanities and social sciences. Traditions include: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: J. Chandrakanthan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
RGT3863HF  L0101

Christianity & World Religions

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the contemporary world, ecumenism must include dialogue between Christianity and world religions. This course will examine not only Christian attitudes to world religions, but also attitudes of world religions to other belief systems. Lectures, discussion, paper.

AD students enrol in RGT6863HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
EMT3873HS  L0101

Law, Ethics, and Society

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The seminar will undertake to study the Islamic Legal Theory (usul al-fiqh) and Practice (fiqh) in conjunction with Islamic ethics, which serves as an integral part of the juridical tradition of Islam. The sources of law like the Qur'an, the Tradition (Sunna), Consensus (Ijma'), Analogy (qiyas) and Reason ('aql) will be examined in connection with the process by which legal decisions in Islam are made. The course will provide an opportunity to students of comparative ethics and law to learn about one of the well-developed religious-ethical systems in Abrahamic traditions. In addition, this course will offer a study of interaction between faith and history in Islam which has impacted upon the development of ethical-legal judgments in the Shari?a. Assessment: Reading papers, book reviews, and a final paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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WYT3927HF  L0101

Ethics of Wealth and Poverty

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will begin with a summation of Biblical teaching about wealth and poverty, and the succeeding sessions will study diverse interpretations of that teaching in the history of Christian thought. Attention will be paid to the historical context of the theology under study, including contemporary ethical teaching and economic practice. The goals of the course will be to appreciate the paradoxical character of Biblical teaching on wealth and poverty, as well as the diverse ways in which theologies on wealth and poverty have reflected the impact of socio-economic change. The value of the study will be its assisting students to cope with 21st century challenges in its uneven regional and social distribution of wealth and poverty. Lectures and seminars. Requirements: one essay and exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Reginald Stackhouse
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT3931HS  L0101

Sexuality & Marriage

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The realities of human sexuality, marriage and family from a Christian perspective. Topics to be considered include: sexuality in the context of the person, marriage as sacrament, marriage permanence, marriage as procreative, marital fidelity, and homosexuality. Two short papers and seminar presentation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
SAT3932HS  L0101

Human Sexuality and Marriage

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the basis of sexuality and marriage and select related issues in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Readings, lectures, discussions, paper, mid-term test, final exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I and II or Permission of Instructor)

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 16
SAT3932HF  L4101

Human Sexuality and Marriage

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Ontario - other Site

A study of the basis of sexuality and marriage and select related issues in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Readings, lectures, discussions, paper, final exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I and II or Permission of Instructor)

Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 to 16:00
Schedule Notes:   Location: Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary Canadian Provincial Office (=Loretto Abbey Complex) 101 Mason Blvd Toronto, ON M5M 3E2 September 21; October 19; November 2; November 23
Instructors: Jeanne Cover
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT3942HF  L0101

Papal Teaching on Social Justice

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical survey of papal thought from Leo XIII's emphasis on workers' rights to John Paul II's focus on the broader theme of human rights. Reflection papers and book report, or major paper, exam. Prerequisite: Introductory course in moral theology.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas Lynch
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
SAT3952HF  L0101

Bioethics

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of select life issues in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Among the topics to be considered are concepts of the person and the question of the meaning of suffering, new reproductive technologies, abortion, healthcare resource challenges, the new genetics and the ethics of enhancement , questions of cooperation, and various end of life issues. Lectures, readings, discussions, paper, book review, mid-term test and final written exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I and II or by Permission of Instructor)

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
RGT3952HS  L0101

Ethical Issues at the End of Life

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on a variety of ethical issues at the end of life. Including existential questions about the meaning and significance of death and dying, suicide, assisted suicide, euthanasia, appropriate ethical care at the end of life, medically assisted nutrition and hydration, and other issues of particular concern to class participants.

AD students enrol in RGT6952HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT3961HS  L0101

The Theological Virtues

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on Thomas Aquinas? treatment of the theological virtues approaching it in relation to recent work in ?Virtue Ethics?. The course begins with recent philosophical work focusing on the recovery of the virtues for moral reflection and life, and addresses key questions and challenges to this renewed emphasis on the virtues. Aquinas? treatment of the virtues will be read in conjunction with both classic and contemporary commentators and critics.

AD students enrol in RGT6961HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes: Max 22 (AD & BD)
EMT3967HS  L0101

Common Good, Social Ethics

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines both the importance and challenges of "common good" and of "community" for the social witness of the church as integral form of the mission of church in the world. Students will clarify their moral stances through close readings of texts and contexts, develop skills to discern and evaluate various policies and activities on specific topics of public concern and attend to implications for social ministry and the public vocation of Christian ethics. Discussion, engaged reflection papers and major project. (This course qualifies as a designated elective in theology or ethics.) Pre-requisites: basic courses in ethics and theology.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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5000 Level Courses
WYT5153HS  L0101

Time and the Word: Conceptualizing the Meaning of Scriptural Figuration

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course seeks to understand the basis upon which the Bible can be read "figuratively", within the context of an understanding of historical and temporal reality. The course makes use of exegesis (1 Corinthians 10, Genesis, and Ephesians 1), history of interpretation (both Christian and Jewish), philosophy of time, and the history of the philosophy of time as relevant to Christian theology and exegesis. The goal of the course is to outline a working framework for understanding how traditional figural referents in the Bible can be sustained in Christian reading of Scripture. Seminar format. Evaluation: Based on seminar performance (discussion and presentation of weekly research - 50%) and a final paper (50%).

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT5239HF  L0101

Kenosis

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores Christian Kenosis as an expression of the unconditional love of God made known in Christ. Here the mutual relations of self-giving in the Trinity may be reflected in the lives of human persons. Of key significance is Hans Urs von Balthasar's appreciation of the paschal mystery. Also in dialogue are: Sarah Coakley, John Paul II and Thomas Merton. Lectures, discussion, class presentations, research paper, one short paper and a research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 22
WYT5410HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/08/12

The Church Evangelical and Catholic

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores a range of proposals in contemporary ecclesiology across the ecumenical spectrum. Special attention will be given to questions surrounding the Church's concretely historical character, as in the ecclesiology of "practices" and its critics. Authors read may include Ratzinger, Jenson, Hauerwas, Cavanaugh, Radner and Healy. Seminar discussion; brief, bullet-point responses to the readings; 2500-word final paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT5412HF  L0101

The Unity of the Church: Theologies of Ecclesial Oneness

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine how Christians and Christian traditions have understood and justified the first "mark of the Church", her unity. This will include an examination of the historical constraints on such understandings. Key writings from the early Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, Western traditions(Catholic and Protestant), and ecumenical authors will be read. Seminar presentations and research papers required.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT5521HF  L0101

Rahner and Lonergan

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Both Karl Rahner and Bernard Lonergan devote much study to the role of philosophy in theology. Moreover, both are influenced importantly in this effort by the modern interpretation of Thomas Aquinas developed earlier by Belgian philosopher and mystical psychologist Joseph Maréchal. However, besides some obvious similarities in what they take from Maréchal, there also are certain crucial (if often unnoticed) differences. This course investigates these crucial philosophical differences and how they influence the basic theological perspectives of Rahner and Lonergan. Special attention will be given to their differing theological accounts of religious experience, Jesus’ human knowledge, and the role of the psychological analogy in Trinitarian theology.

 

Schedule: Friday, 10:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Vertin
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
TRT5530HF  L0101

Readings in Augustine

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examination of Augustine's writings against the Manichaeans, the Donatists, and the Pelagians. Discussion of weekly readings and a major paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
RGT5552HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/04/02

Aquinas on the Spiritual Life

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines Thomas Aquinas' theology of the Christian life as it is presented in the 'secunda secundae' of the 'Summa Theologiae': faith, hope and love are the foundational principles that ground the concrete living out the 'imitatio Christi' in a life of prayer, service, preaching and leadership in the Church. The course teaches a method of closed textual reading, and proposes an interpretation of Aquinas' own method that distinguishes and holds together doctrinal judgements and systematic understanding.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT5568HS  L0101

Barth on the Human Creature

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A seminar course in which "Church Dogmatics III/2" will be studied. The topics: the human in the cosmos; the human as an object of theological knowledge; the human as a creature of God, and as the covenant partner of God; the human as body and soul; the human in time. Weekly readings, class participation; an in-class presentation; an oral examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT5578HS  L0101

Lonergan's Method in Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course introduces five aspects of advanced theological research through a critical reading of Bernard Lonergan's Method in Theology. Lonergan's methodological approach is exemplified and complemented by rhetorical analysis, genetic analysis, source reading, clarification by contrast and systematic reasoning. Readings, bulletin board participation, critical book review, seminar, major paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
TRT5579HS  L0101

Kierkegaard's Studies

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Central ideas in the Kierkegaard corpus and their relevance to contemporary theological and philosophical concerns. Introductory lecture, seminar discussion of readings, discussions, one major term paper.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
TXT5590HS  L0101

Two Swiss Radicals - Karl Barth and Hans Urs von Balthasar

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Committed to Christ, configured by their respective traditions, clearly friends, these two theologians were respectful at all times in their dialogue, distinctive in their differences and exemplified ecumenism in the academy and at the level of pastoral interchange. The Twentieth century Christian world was indebted to the work of Karl Barth and Hans Urs von Balthasar; this course is a chance to learn why and what impact their theology has in the twenty first century.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding, Joseph Mangina
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 22
RGT5601HF  L0101

Faith and Culture

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The purpose of this course is to survey the contemporary trends in the theology of faith and culture with an emphasis on mission, dialogue, interculteration, and the emergence of contextual theologies. A major portion of the course will focus on understanding the paradigm shift from a classicist notion of culture to one that has given rise to the various contextual approaches and the so-called "World Christianity(ies)." We will survey some of the various models, methods, and issues involved in this paradigm shift. The course will also highlight certain tensions arising from this context such as the local-universal church tension, the dialogue-evangelism tension, the interculturation-syncretism tension, and the question of the theology of religions. Major paper.

Schedule: Monday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
SMT5615HS  L0101

Vatican II: Text and Context

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An in-depth study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) with an emphasis on the historical context, redaction history of the text, theological content, systematic relationships, and contemporary questions of conciliar reception and hermeneutics. The course will consist of weekly readings, seminar presentations and focused in-class discussion. Students will be evaluated on class participation, one seminar presentation and a research essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
RGT5621HF  L0101

Theological Ethics Doctoral Seminar

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will focus on the writings of Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant that have been and continue to be seminal texts for the contemporary discipline of moral theology/theological ethics. The goal will be to understand their conceptions of human happiness, the nature of morality, the means (actions, virtues, sin, law, grace, friendship) by which one pursues happiness or lives morally. We will also attend to their understanding of the individual and political society. While we will focus on primary sources, students will also be introduced to key interpretations of Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant by contemporary moral theologians.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
TRT5631HS  L0101

Juan Luis Segundo and the Theology of Liberation

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examination of the major writings of Juan Luis Segundo. His place in the emergence and establishment of Latin American Liberation Theology, relationship between theology and social theory in his work.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
KNT5651HS  L0101

Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the development of Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology in the 20th and 21st century with a focus on the dimensions of missional ecclesiology for the North American context. The course will explore the theological origins of ecumenical missional ecclesiology, the biblical and hermeneutical dimension of such theology, the present context and its relationship to such ecclesiology and the direction of ecumenical missional ecclesiology. Evaluation: Seminars, papers. Prerequisite: AD program enrolment.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT5671HF  L0101

Cross-cultural Religious Thought

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of the idea of self in Hinduism and Islam through representative contemporary thinkers Rabindranath Tagore and Muhammad Iqbal respectively. How is self understood? What is its relation to the ideas of person and personal identity? What are the philosophical and theological presuppositions of the idea of self? Answers are supplemented by classical and other contemporary writings of the religious tradition in question, thereby accessing the worldview associated with that tradition. Introductory lecture, weekly student presentations and discussions or assigned readings. Prerequisite: a course in theology or philosophy of religion. Requirements: Class participation and presentations 10% (weeks 2-12); Report/Critique (due 4th week) 15%; Midterm class test (week 7) 25%; Essay (due last week) 50%.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
TRT5703HS  L0101

The Nature of Religious Thought

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examination of the nature of theology from its emergence with the ancient Greek philosophers to its establishment as an academic enterprise in the middle ages. Seminar presentations (2) and a major paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC24
RGT5729HS  L0101

Theology and Spirituality of Dorothee Soelle

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Critically explores the theology and spirituality of Dorothee Soelle, with special attention on the themes of creation-liberation theology, suffering, God, feminist concerns, embodied spirituality, and mysticism. Seminar discussion, lecture, short presentations, major essay.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: Max 16
ICT5763HS  L0101

Metaphysics after Auschwitz: Adorno's Negative Dialectics

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

No serious philosopher after Kant has been able to avoid his critique of metaphysical speculations about God, the soul, and the meaning of existence. The horrors of recent history give added urgency to such questions. Theodor W. Adorno has posed these issues in dramatic and decisive ways. This seminar studies his reflections in Negative Dialectics on the status of metaphysics "after Auschwitz."

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Permission of the instructor
TRT5867HF  L0101

Religious Pluralism as Theological Challenge

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Challenges of religious pluralism to Christianity appearing from outside Christianity, and responses to it. How do other world religious traditions think about Christianity or religions for that matter? What are the theoretical problems of religious pluralism and the response to them from within Christianity? Discussions of selected readings and occasional lectures as appropriate.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
TRT5936HS  L0101

"Radical Evil": Religious, Philosophical and Psychoanalytic Responses

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Terrorism, war, genocide, sexual abuse, murder: how can the human mind make sense of these horrors without reducing them to the 'obscenity of understanding', of trying to imagine the unimaginable? How can we possibly try to imagine the mind of perpetrators of violence, sexual abuse and terror? Yet these phenomena are becoming more pervasive and immediate and the destruction of human bodies and minds is worsening. How is it possible to sustain hope and faith in human goodness when our capacity for evil grows more sinister and ingenious? We will explore these and other questions comparatively and cross-culturally, examining the perspectives of religious, philosophical and psychoanalytic thinkers who represent Western and non-Western cultural and religious traditions.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
EMT5943HF  L0101

Transformative Women's Work in Theology and Ethics

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Readings in feminist theology, ethics, and critical theory to provide advanced resources for linking spiritual life and struggles to transform vast structures of injustice and violation with responsiveness to women's diverse lives, needs, and communities. Attention to challenges and methods central for feminist and Christian faith-and-justice ethics as applied to specific movements for transformation and to the development of collegial skills in discussions and scholarship.  Collaborative seminar format, presentations and responses, major paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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TRT5948HF  L0101

Critical Theory of Religion from a Psychoanalytic Perspective

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inquiry into the role and meaning of religion in a post/metaphysical, post/secular time within the frameworks of critical theory, psychoanalysis and ethics. Authors include Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Freud, Habermas and their theological/religious interlocutors, i.e. Charles Davis, Elisabeth Schuessler Fiorenza, Hent de Vries. Major paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 248
6000 Level Courses
EMT6020HS  L0101

Interwined Texts: Bible and Qur'an in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Interfaith dialogue has many avenues, of which reading each other’s sacred texts is one of the most conducive to building understanding.  The scriptures of Islam, Judaism and Christianity are particularly suited to this venture, because of the shared narratives, which demonstrate both commonalities and profound differences.   This course focuses on narratives shared between the Bible and the Quran and how major Muslim, Christian, and Jewish scholars have approached the relationship between the texts across the ages. The course examines scholars such as Tabari (d. 923), Ibn Kathir (d. 1373), Abraham Geiger (d. 1874), W. St. Clair Tisdall (d.1929), Angelika Neuwirth and others.  Students will learn the difference between author- and reader-oriented approaches, influence theory and intertextuality, and how different presuppositions can impact how the texts and their relationship are read.  Students will also have the opportunity to engage in scripture-based interfaith dialogue and to experience first-hand how some of the established and developing approaches are practiced.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3020HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda El-Tahry
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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RGT6320HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/17

Doing Justice with Spirit

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological perspectives and spiritual practices for integrating faith and the work for justice, peace and a healthy environment. Evaluation by essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3320HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGT6322HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/05

Contemplation in Action

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Ignatius of Loyola wanted Jesuits to be "contemplatives in action". This describes the desire of many Christians today and the imperatives thrust upon us to be at once boned with God and with our fellow travellers. Reading in Loyola Zizioulas, J Macmurray, early Christian and contemporary theologians and mystics. NT accounts of prayer and action in Jesus of Nazareth. 20-25 page essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3322HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGT6333HS  L0101

Transformative Dynamics of Grace

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Participants explore the biblical sources, historical development, systematic elaboration, ecumenical context and transformative social implications of the doctrine of grace. Written assignments are varied in order to help participants sort out the different tasks involved in doing theology and progress toward a final synthetic case study. 3000 Level: lectures, quizzes, short papers. 6000 Level: lectures, seminar, book review, research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3333HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jeremy Wilkins
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
ICT6352HF  L0101

Facing the Darkness: The (Human) Nature of Evil

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

We shall discuss the origin and nature of evil by engaging various biblical, theological, and anthropological resources. Topics will include lament literature (e.g. Job), natural evil, idolatry and the demonic, original sin and the correlation between victim and agent, and the relationship between justice and mercy. The course will consist of seminars in which participants will engage key readings relevant to the practice of interdisciplinary theology.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3352HF.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT6370HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/09/10

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practical integration.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3370HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
CGT6401HF  L0101

The Eucharist/Lord's Supper in Ecumenical Perspective

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is an historical and theological study of the development of Eucharistic thought and worship in the West, with some reference to the East. It uses a seminar format, in which class members have read the assigned readings and are able to join in their analysis under the guidance of the professor. Particular attention will be paid to twentieth century attempts to reconsider theological liturgical, and political considerations that have divided the church on the source of its unity.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Schedule Notes: Toronto School of Theology, 47 Queen's Park Crescent East.  Seminar room.
Instructors: John D. Rempel
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 15

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RGT6410HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will provide an introduction to the theology of the Church and the Church

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3410HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
KNT6501HF  L0101

Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will consist in a close reading of the English text of Calvin's "Institution Christianae religions" of 1559. We begin by situating Calvin's theology in the historical and theological context of the 16th century Reformation before turning to a careful examination of the "Institutes'" major doctrinal themes and their significance both for Calvin's context and the subsequent history of Protestant theology. Seminar style. weekly readings and reflections; major paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNT3501HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John A. Vissers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRT6501HF  L0101

Theology of Martin Luther

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course probes Luther's understanding of major Christian doctrines. Theological ferment in the Sixteenth Century will be examined in every class, including Luther's (theological) relationship to other Magisterial Reformers, Radical Reformers, and Roman-Catholic/ Counter-Reformation Reformers. Attention will also be paid to such matters as the extent to which the Magisterial Reformation was an aspect of Renaissance Humanism or a departure from it, and the (putative) anti-Semitism of Luther and its relation to more recent manifestations of anti- Semitism. Weekly readings, lectures, and classroom discussions. Essay (50%) and final examination (50%).

Basic Degree students enrol in TRT3501HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Victor A. Shepherd
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
WYT6510HF  L0101

The Sin Seminar: Engaging Hamartiology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Doctrine of Sin has suffered several critiques in recent times, and yet we live in an era aware of structural injustices and horrendous evil. This course will consider the major approaches to the doctrine in the tradition, the insights available in art and literature, and what a reconstruction of the doctrine might look like. Relations to contemporary subjects like psychotherapy and brain science will also be considered.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3510HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: George R. Sumner
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT6530HF  L0101

Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Overview and critical survey of the main elements of Bernard Lonergan's thought emphasizing his contribution as a significant Canadian thinker and the Thomistic and Ignatian context of this thought. We will emphasize Lonergan's philosophy of intentional consciousness, its basis for philosophical and theological method, the application of his method to select topics in systemic theology, social development, and post-humous developments of this thought.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3530HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
TRT6566HF  L0101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRT3566HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
KNT6585HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/03/26

The Theology of Jurgen Moltmann

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore the major theological themes addressed by Jurgen Moltmann in relation to the traditions of Reformed Theology. Students will read key works of the author, engage in seminar presentations, and will do a research paper on an aspect of Moltmann's theology.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNT3585HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT6605HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/06

Comparative Theology Seminar

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to comparative theology and comparative theologies, with special attention to their close interrelation and emergence with comparative religion and religious studies in the modern period. Our study will begin with a genealogical examination of the early modern discipline of "comparative theology", a liberal Christian project designed to overcome the prejudices and limitations of "dogmatic theology" through its engagement with the claims of other religious traditions. In a second major unit of the course, we will examine the mutual self-definition of neo-Orthodox theology and the field of comparative religious studies in the mid-twentieth centuries including the efforts to build bridges between these disciplines by prominent theologians in North America. Finally, we will turn our attention to contemporary critiques of comparative religion itself and the emergence of a "new" comparative theology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3605HS.

Schedule: Friday, 10:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Reid B. Locklin
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 8
Enrollment Notes: AD:4, BD:4
CGT6621HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/11/13

Theologizing in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a survey of defining theological, ethical and spiritual writings in sixteenth century Anabaptism and its descendent movements, especially Mennonites. It offers an understanding of the religious and cultural forces that have shaped this tradition. It focuses especially on the flowering of North American Mennonite theology throughout the twentieth century and of global Mennonite theology after 1975. The course will proceed in a modified seminar format with an introductory lecture to each day's topic.

Basic Degree students enrol in CGT3621HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:00 to 11:00
Schedule Notes: Toronto School of Theology, 47 Queen's Park Crescent East.  Seminar Room
Instructors: John D. Rempel
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 15
SMT6652HS  L0101

An Introduction to Eco-Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Using the writings of Thomas Berry & theologians who work with the new cosmology, the course provides an introduction to eco-theology as well as the ways eco-theologians are articulating new understandings of theological anthropology, revelation, Christology, pneumatology, sin and salvation, and eschatology. Adult learning methods. Evaluation: participation, practical integration, reflection paper and integration paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3652HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20
EMT6672HF  L0101

Theology, Violence, and Peace

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores theological reflection in relation to violence and peace, particularly in Christian traditions. Theories of violence and non-violence as well as case studies from the past and present will provide the means to investigate the ways faith-based claims justify or promote enmity and hostility and/or hospitality and peacemaking in Christian practice. Attention may be given to violence/peace in connection with theologies of revelation and atonement; justice/love; gender, race, ethnicity, class, and disability; Empire and globalization processes; interfaith relations with Jewish, Muslim, and Canadian Aboriginal communities; and the possibility of forgiveness and reconciliation. Lectures, discussions, journal exercises, book review, presentation, and final research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3672HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT6682HS  L0101

Human Sexuality in a Christian Perspective

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine human sexuality from a range of theological and historical perspectives: scriptural, doctrinal, sociological, and ethical. Questions of sexual differentiation, desire, procreation, family, and marriage and celibacy will be discussed. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a broad base from which to discern a consistent pattern of Christian understanding regarding sexuality, within both historical and contemporary diversities. The course will engage broad reading, lecture, and discussion, with a final paper aimed at outlining and justifying a teaching syllabus for teenagers within a church setting (15 pages). Advanced Degree students will have an expanded reading list and will be writing a longer research paper on a chosen set topic relating to Christian formation with regard to sexuality within pluralistic cultures.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3682HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6702HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2013/12/04

Religion, Life and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the Amsterdam School of neoCalvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and in other schools of thought.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3702HS.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Please note:  In order to complete your registration for this course, you must contact the ICS Associate Academic Dean / Registrar at academic-registrar@icscanada.edu
ICT6702HF  L0101

Religion, Life and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the Amsterdam School of neoCalvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and in other schools of thought.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3702HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6716HF  L0101

Wittgenstein: Language & the Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Wittgenstein's philosophy continues to generate enormous interest, and his name is frequently cited in connection with radical developments in theology and the philosophy of religion. Via an exploration of the different accounts of language and meaning he presents in both his early and later work, this course will focus on his thought as it relates to religious belief and commitment in particular.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3716HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6732HS  L0101

Ricoeur: Language & the Sacred

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will focus on two of Ricoeur?s essay collections, From Text to Action and Figuring the Sacred. Students will explore the general shape of Ricoeur?s hermeneutical phenomenology, including such themes as textual interpretation, action, explanation, understanding, ideology, and utopia.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3732HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6753HS  L0101

The Nature (and Grace) of Modern Theology

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the work of seminal Protestant and Catholic theologians associated with the re-shaping of 'modern' theology in the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the 'nature-grace' relationship - understood as the distinction and connection that theologians posit or discern between 'divine' and 'human' power, freedom, and desire. The famous debate between Karl Barth and Emil Brunner (Natural Theology, ET, 1948) , and the more recent discussions of Leonardo Boff (Liberating Grace, ET, 1979) and Stephen Duffy (The Graced Horizon: Nature and Grace in Modern Catholic Thought, 1992) will stimulate our contemporary reflections on the 'covenantal' nature of reality and the spirituality of existence. Participants will engage key reading s in a seminar setting.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3753HS.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6761HF  L0101

Theories of Language and Interpretation: Gadamer, Kristeva, and Searle

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The linguistic turn and the interpretive turn in twentieth-century philosophy play a role in many cultural controversies and academic debates. This seminar examines representative texts from three schools of thought: German philosophical hermeneutics (Hans-Georg Gadamer), French poststructural feminism (Julia Kristeva), and Anglo-American analytical philosophy of language (John Searle).

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3761HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6782HF  L6101

Creative Communication: Culture, Art and Politics

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

Everyone participates in the arts and culture, but who can say why? This course asks why the arts are important and addresses issues that face contemporary creators and interpreters of culture. Our aim is to develop imaginative, faith-oriented participation in the arts and culture. We will consider such topics as artistic freedom and social responsibility; communication through the arts and culture; the impact of globalization on cultural communities; the ethics of mass entertainment; the aesthetic quality of urban environments; and the role of arts in worship and interreligious dialogue. In addition to class sessions, we will attend various events in the city. Lecture, discussion, class presentations, attendance of public events, paper writing. Class participation: 20% / Seminar presentations: 30% / Research project: 50%.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3782HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT6809HF  L0101

Doing Theology in the Canadian Context

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of doing theology in the Canadian Context. Using a multidisciplinary approach (literary, social, political and economic) the course will examine how this particular context affects how we think, pray and act as Christians.
Evaluation for BD: Class participation and 2 papers (10 pages each).
Evaluation for AD:  Class participation and major paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3809HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Mary Jo Leddy
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
Additional Notes: This course previously had the title "God & Caesar at the 49th"
RGT6863HF  L0101

Christianity & World Religions

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the contemporary world, ecumenism must include dialogue between Christianity and world religions. This course will examine not only Christian attitudes to world religions, but also attitudes of world religions to other belief systems. Lectures, discussion, paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3863HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT6952HS  L0101

Ethical Issues at the End of Life

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on a variety of ethical issues at the end of life. Including existential questions about the meaning and significance of death and dying, suicide, assisted suicide, euthanasia, appropriate ethical care at the end of life, medically assisted nutrition and hydration, and other issues of particular concern to class participants.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3952HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT6961HS  L0101

The Theological Virtues

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on Thomas Aquinas? treatment of the theological virtues approaching it in relation to recent work in ?Virtue Ethics?. The course begins with recent philosophical work focusing on the recovery of the virtues for moral reflection and life, and addresses key questions and challenges to this renewed emphasis on the virtues. Aquinas? treatment of the virtues will be read in conjunction with both classic and contemporary commentators and critics.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3961HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes: Max 22 (AD & BD)
Historical Crosslisted Courses
WYH2311HS  L6101

History of Missions and Development

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Outlines the history of Christian missions from its beginnings in Pentecost to the end of the 20th century, followed by area studies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Europe, and concluding with a consideration of the transition from missions to development to post-development. Short papers and collaborative internet project.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH3236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

AD students enrol in TRH6236HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
ICH3350HS  L0101

Art, Religion and Theology: "Theologies" of Art in the Christian Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture in Eastern and Western Christendom. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Students will be evaluated on class participation, seminar presentations, and a research paper on an approved topic. The methodology used in the course will be a mix of lecture and class discussion on assigned readings. Class participation, 20%; seminar presentations, 30%; Major research paper, 50%.

AD students enrol in ICH6350HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH3755HF  L0101

Eastern Christian icons

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

AD students enrol in RGH6755HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
SMH5054HF  L0101

Origen

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Study of Origen's life and thought in historical context. Reading and analysis of major works. Greek and Latin are useful but not required. Seminar presentations, participation in discussion, one research essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 10 · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH5752HS  L0101

With/Out Reason: Art and Imagination in the Western Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will explore the special relationship of the arts to the concept of the imagination in the history of Western thought. It will also consider the implications this relationship was had for art's role in the areas of theology and ethics, areas in which reason has been thought to fail in providing adequate knowledge.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:45 to 14:45
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH6236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3236HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
ICH6350HS  L0101

Art, Religion and Theology: "Theologies" of Art in the Christian Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture in Eastern and Western Christendom. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Students will be evaluated on class participation, seminar presentations, and a research paper on an approved topic. The methodology used in the course will be a mix of lecture and class discussion on assigned readings. Class participation, 20%; seminar presentations, 30%; Major research paper, 50%.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3350HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH6755HF  L0101

Eastern Christian icons

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGH3755HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
Interdisciplinary Crosslisted Courses
SAJ1501HY  L0101

Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Beginning with a quick review of English grammar, the course will introduce the grammar and syntax of the Latin language and provide practice in their use in order to lead students to a reading knowledge of Ecclesiastical Latin: the Vulgate, Canon Law, Ambrose, Augustine, Jerome, Aquinas, hymns and other documents. Evaluation will be based on course assignments, weekly class participation, periodic tests and a final exam. Please note: the second hour of each class is a mandatory tutorial.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Carla De Santis, TBA
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Min: 8 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Pastoral Theology Crosslisted Courses
RGP3206HF  L0101

Classics of Christian Spirituality

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course develops major themes in the history of Christian spirituality, through a close reading of selections by Plato, Origen, Pseudo-Dionysius, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Gregory of Palamas, Julian of Norwich, St. Ignatius of Loyola, and Dorothy Day. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGP6206HF.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGP3212YS  L0101

Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The goal of this intensive course is 1. to prepare a student to present the spiritual exercises 2. to allow the student to understand the dynamics of these exercises 3. to expose the student to the underlying theology of these exercises. All this will be done through an close reading of the text of the Exercises from the perspective of the experienced director using interdisciplinary studies in theology, literature, and the humanities. Pre-requisites: 1. Some personal experience of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola; 2. Permission from the professor. NOTE: This course is for double credit and meets twice a week in two 2- hour sections. For Basic Degree Students: word essays, class participation and presentations. For Advanced Degree Students: word essays, 1 major paper, and active class participation.

AD students enrol in RGP6212YS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Other Information: Second Semester · Two Credits · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGP3281HS  L0101

Religious Experience in the World's Religions

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the nature of religious experience in some of the major religions of the world, with special attention to Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Native North American, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. It includes some comparative analysis between traditions, and creative reflection on the theological and pastoral significance of such comparative study. Lecture, discussion, four short reflection papers, one major essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42 · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP5209HF  L0101

Spiritual Theology of Evelyn Underhill

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of the mystical, liturgical and pastoral theology of Evelyn Underhill, as she develops these in her novels and scholarly writings. Her thought will be examined in light of contemporary issues in spirituality, such as the status of the body, mysticism and social action, the subjectivization of mystical experiences, and the effect of socio-political structures on spirituality. Lectures, discussion, presentation, critical reflection paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGP6206HF  L0101

Classics of Christian Spirituality

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course develops major themes in the history of Christian spirituality, through a close reading of selections by Plato, Origen, Pseudo-Dionysius, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Gregory of Palamas, Julian of Norwich, St. Ignatius of Loyola, and Dorothy Day. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3206HF.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)
RGP6212YS  L0101

Spirituality Excersses of St. Ignatius

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The goal of this intensive course is 1. to prepare a student to present the spiritual exercises 2. to allow the student to understand the dynamics of these exercises 3. to expose the student to the underlying theology of these exercises. All this will be done through an close reading of the text of the Exercises from the perspective of the experienced director using interdisciplinary studies in theology, literature, and the humanities. Pre-requisites: 1. Some personal experience of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola; 2. Permission from the professor. NOTE: This course is for double credit and meets twice a week in two 2- hour sections. For Basic Degree Students: word essays, class participation and presentations. For Advanced Degree Students: word essays, 1 major paper, and active class participation.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3212YS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Other Information: Second Semester · Two Credits · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 16 (AD & BD)

47 Queen's Park Crescent East · Toronto, Ontario · M5S 2C3 · Canada · Tel: 416-978-4039 · Fax: 416-978-7821 · E-mail: inquiries @ tst.edu
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