Online Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of 2012-2013

SAB1003HS  L6101

Introduction to the Old Testament

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  New Course · Online Course

This online course provides an introduction to the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible and its three main canonical divisions with an emphasis on theological interpretation. Students will be familiarized with the biblical books and their historical context. The course also explores the history of biblical interpretation with an application to Old Testament texts. Lectures, readings, online participation, written assignments, final paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Igal German
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
RGH1010HS  L6101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Online Course

Offered On-Line: From the subapostolic age to the “Triumph of Orthodoxy” in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Weekly on-line participation, short papers, research paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 18
KNT1101HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  New Course · Online Course

Basic principles of reformed theology and their significance in current theological debate. Lecture.

Schedule:
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYB1501HS  L6101

From the Gospel to the Gospels (NT I)

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the four Gospels in their social, historical and theological settings. Using a "socio-literary" approach, we will study the Gospels within a two-dimensional framework, both centred on what the early Christians called the "gospel" or "Kerygma." One dimension has to do with social history — the origin and development of Christianity as a distinct social entity, from its foundations in the ministry of Jesus and the Easter experience, through its emergence as a Jewish renewal movement, and on to its development into a separate, largely Gentile, institutionalized religion. The second dimension has to do with literature — the process by which the Gospels came to be written, their literary form and texture, and their character as narrative versions of the "gospel." Weekly online lectures, assigned analysis/reflection papers, discussion board postings.

This is an online class.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Allan Loder
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
KNB1511HF  L6101

New Testament Greek I

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Online Course

An introduction to the grammar and syntax of Koine Greek. Students will also develop a basic proficiency in reading and pronouncing the text of the Greek New Testament. Lecture, group work, evaluation of Greek pronunication. Weekly assignments, midterm project, final exam.

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
KNB1512HS  L6101

New Testament Greek II

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

An introduction to the grammar and syntax of Koine Greek. Students will also develop a basic proficiency in reading and pronouncing the text of the Greek New Testament. Lecture, group work, evaluation of Greek pronunciation.  Weekly assignments midterm project, final exam. Prerequisite: New Testament Greek 1 or equivalent.

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT1711HS  L6101

Introduction to Thomas Aquinas

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course is an introduction to the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), the most influential Catholic theologian of the last millennium. No previous knowledge of Aquinas or of philosophy is presumed. We will start by looking at Aquinas' program of remaking Christian theology in light of the best philosophy and science of his day; then we will examine his views on human action, human nature, human knowing and philosophical theology. Lectures, discussion, short papers and final exam. On-line discussion, book review, 2,000 word paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
SAT1905HF  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/08/10

Moral Theology

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

An introduction to the foundations of Catholic moral reasoning and its application to select contemporary issues. Among the topics to be studied are scripture, tradition, natural law, relationship between faith & morality, moral norms, virtue and vice, freedom, conscience and magisterium, etc. Readings, lectures, discussions, short written assignments, final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: TBA
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
TRH2061HF  L6101

The Birth of Theology

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to Patristic thought to 451 AD, surveying principal writers East and West. Detailed study of Athanasius On the Incarnation and The Tome of Leo. Lectures, readings, four short reports and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRH2105HS  L6101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2210HF  L6101

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

This introductory course examines the history of Christianity from the Peace of Westphalia (1648) to the end of the twentieth century. As will be demonstrated throughout the course, the major catalyst for change has been, and continues to be, the constant tension between the inherently static nature of the historic Church and the forces of modernity. Throughout the course we will see how modern culture, which includes but is not limited to, contemporary politics, philosophy, literature, and painting, exercised an overwhelming influence on the development of eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century, and twentieth-century Christianity. Two short research summaries submitted online (40%), participation (20%), final exam submitted online (40%)

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
TRH2252HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/03/26

Natural Theology and Evolutionary Theory in the Nineteenth Century

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

This introductory course examines the influence of, and contemporary reaction to, natural theology, evolution theory, and Charles Darwin's "natural selection" theory, from the late eighteenth century until the Scopes Trial (1925). Although the course focuses on England and the United States, we will also make a tertiary examination of defenders and critics of natural theology, evolutionary theory, and natural selection theory in Continental Europe and Canada. Two short research summaries submitted online (40%), participation (20%), final exam submitted online (40%)

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
TRH2253HS  L6101

Modern Atheism

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

This introductory course surveys the history of atheism and secularization from the mid-eighteenth-century Western European Enlightenment to the present. We will not only read selections from some of the most important English, Scottish, German, and American atheists, agnostics, and rationalists of the period, but also examine and discuss how contemporary political and social thought contributed to the rise of secular thought and gradual decline in theological orthodoxy. The course will demonstrate how the writings of atheists and theological rationalists have always been predicated on significant intellectual and emotional tensions between orthodox Christianity and contemporary culture. Participation, research summary, book report, online final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
WYP2301HS  L6101

Basics of Preaching

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The student will develop a theological framework regarding the character and place of preaching in the life of a local Church. This includes the place of the Church within the mission of God, the importance of analyzing and engaging with the way culture shapes the local community, and the understanding of what it means to be faithful to God in the way we handle the biblical text. The student will also learn to identify and implement the basic skills that are foundational to preaching. Weekly reading, listening to sermons by a variety of preachers, class participation, preparation, delivery and critique of sermons.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Annette Brownlee
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2316HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/03/26

Philosophy of Ecclesiastical History: Sacred and Profane

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · Online Course

This introductory historiographical course surveys select 'sacred' and 'profane' works of church history by some of the most important ecclesiastical historians and philosophers active from the mid-first century AD until the mid-twentieth century (including, but not limited to, Luke, Augustine, Foxe, Bossuet, Voltaire, Hegel, Ranke, and Acton). Participation in online discussion group, research paper, critical response/book report, online final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
TRJ2631HS  L6101

Anglican History And Theology

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introductory study of the Anglican communion as a worldwide form of Christianity; its history, key theological issues, worship, schools of thought, approaches to spirituality. 3 short papers. Interdisciplinary History and Theology.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYB2660HF  L6101

Who is Jesus? (NT II)

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the content of a portion of the New Testament: 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 Corinthians, Galatians, Romans, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Peter, Hebrews and Revelation.  The guiding question of the course is "Who is Jesus?".Online lectures, textbook readings, discussion groups. Evaluation: exegetical papers, online discussions.. Prerequisite: WYB1501 or equivalent.

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Ann Jervis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
WYT2912HF  L6101

The Drama of Christian Ethics

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Online Course

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Christian ethics, not as a cerebral and academic discipline but as a lived, embodied Christian reality. It is designed with the intent of providing the student with a framework through which to understand what it means to live as the church within the complexities of the social, moral, and political world of the 21st century. The themes of drama, narrative, acting, and especially "improvisation" provide the conceptual lens through which we will engage various ethical complexities such as genetic-bio-ethical issues, sexuality, family and marriage, pacifism and war, or ecological ethics. This will be an online course with a written lecture format, weekly readings, student participation in weekly discussion questions, one minor assignment, and a final major paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Patrick McManus
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
TRT3566HF  L6101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

AD students enrol in TRT6566HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2600HS  L6101

Theological Anthropology

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2011 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Exploration of the following themes in the light of Christian revelation: creation, community, body & soul, humanity as male and female, sin, grace, eschatology. Lectures, readings, presentations, final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Vivian Ligo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25 · Crosslisted to:
SAB2902HF  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/06/04

Introducing the Book of Psalms

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the Book of Psalms with an emphasis on its spirituality. The following topics to be considered: creation, Israelite history and institute of kingship, communal pilgrimage, sacred space and time, covenant and law, messianic expectations, exile and restoration, individual and corporate worship, and biblical ethics as reflected in the Hebrew Psalter. The class will be also familiarized with the conventions of Hebrew poetry, the use of psalms in Jewish and Christian liturgy, the history of Psalms interpretation (particular attention will be paid to the New Testament and Patristic hermeneutics), canon, structure, authorship, and dating. The objective of this course is to help students to develop exegetical skills and apply those to the study of individual Psalms. A complete reading of the Book of Psalms is mandatory. Instructional methods: lecture notes, assigned readings, online participation, assignments, final paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Igal German
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
ICP3450HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/10/23

Curriculum: Organising the World for Learning

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Curriculum is the selection and organisation of experience for pedagogical purposes. The criteria  that determine what is selected and how it is organised articulate fundamental values about the nature of the world and our calling in it. This course will encourage critical evaluation of the criteria that are commonly employed and of how the curriculum can be shaped to better reflect a Christian worldview. Curriculum is conceived not as a static collection of materials, but as a dynamic plan that directs the learning process and governs the organically developing relationship between teachers and learners. The course employs an extensive Study Guide, two books plus book chapters and journal articles, with an online discussion forum and Skype/ telephone conferencing. Participation in the forum and a professionally- oriented research paper will provide the basis for evaluation. Study Guide to accompany texts and readings; online discussion forum; Skype/ telephone conferencing. Online Forum participation (30%); Research paper (70%). 

 

AD students enrol in ICP6450HS.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Douglas Blomberg
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICP3483HF  L6101

Ways of Learning

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Participants in the course will investigate and evaluate significant perspectives on the learning process in order to understand the assumptions of various theories and to interpret these from a biblically- informed standpoint. They will review current research into child development and learning (e.g. brain research, cognitive processes, multiple intelligences, learning styles ) in seeking to develop a coherent understanding of the relationships between various learning theories, on the basis of a Christian view of the person and of the knowledge. An action research project will enable participants to test an approach to learning that is relevant to their educational responsibilities. The course employs and extensive Study Guide, three books plus book chapters and journal articles, with an online discussion forum and Skype/ telephone conferencing. Participation in the forum and a professionally-oriented research paper will provide the basis for evaluation. Study Guide to accompany texts and readings; online discussion forum; Skype/ telephone conferencing. Online forum participation (30%); Research paper (70%).

 

AD students enrol in ICP6483HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Douglas Blomberg
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICP6450HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2012/10/23

Curriculum: Organising the World for Learning

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  New Course · Online Course

Basic Degree students enrol in ICP3450HS.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Douglas Blomberg
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICP6483HF  L6101

Ways of Learning

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Participants in the course will investigate and evaluate significant perspectives on the learning process in order to understand the assumptions of various theories and to interpret these from a biblically- informed standpoint. They will review current research into child development and learning (e.g. brain research, cognitive processes, multiple intelligences, learning styles ) in seeking to develop a coherent understanding of the relationships between various learning theories, on the basis of a Christian view of the person and of the knowledge. An action research project will enable participants to test an approach to learning that is relevant to their educational responsibilities. The course employs and extensive Study Guide, three books plus book chapters and journal articles, with an online discussion forum and Skype/ telephone conferencing. Participation in the forum and a professionally-oriented research paper will provide the basis for evaluation. Study Guide to accompany texts and readings; online discussion forum; Skype/ telephone conferencing. Online forum participation (30%); Research paper (70%).

 

Basic Degree students enrol in ICP3483HF.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Douglas Blomberg
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
KNP1446HF  L6101

Intro to Educational Ministry

Offered in Fall 2012  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

"Do we believe that Christian Education would make the church or society different?  If so, how can we reshape Christian Education in our congregations in order to make the church and society different?  What would be the best approach to Christian education for our congregations today?  Keeping these questions in mind, we will open the world of Christian education, engaging in dialogue with theorists in that discipline.  We will explore educational theories and the wways of refashioning it for today's church and society, and create a vision of Christian education in order to make a congregation different."

Schedule:
Instructors: Nam Soon Song
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICB2010HS  L6101

Biblical Foundations

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the Bible as the ongoing story of and for God and creation, paying special attention to the way in which God's story is intertwined with that of humanity and the world. In asking whether and in what way the Bible is also our story, we will attempt to identify which hermeneutical methods might help us discern its significance for present day life, including the academic enterprise.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: TBA
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3940HS  L6101

Christianity and the Ecological Crisis

Offered in Winter 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

”The attitudes to save the environment should be imbued with a vision of the sacred.”
—David Suzuki at the Global Forum of the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development, Rio de Janeiro, 5 June, 1992

Critics often blame Christian culture, and sometimes rightly, for either ignoring or contributing to the global ecological crisis.  This course will examine some Christian responses to the ecological crisis that contest this characterization. These include claims that the responsibility for the global ecological crisis is complex and multifaceted as well as arguments that Christianity can resist and undo the attitudes that helped create the crisis. We shall explore agrarian essays, ecological theology, and international initiatives on ecological activities. We may also visit a farm whose inhabitants integrate their faith and their lifestyle. In this discussion-intensive seminar, participants will consider what role Christian faith can and should play in a strong environmental ethic.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: TBA
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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