Theological Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of 2009-2010

Course Listings by Level

Crosslisted Courses

1000 Level Courses
SAT1101HF  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the nature, task and history of Roman Catholic Theology by a study of its sources: Revelation, Faith, Scripture (Canonicity, Inspiration, Inerrancy), Tradition, Magisterium, Development of Doctrine and Papal Infallibility. Also examined is the expression: "Outside the church there is no salvation". Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test. Preference given to St. Augustine’s Seminary Diaconate Formation Diploma students

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Vivian Ligo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
KNT1101HS  L0101

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Basic principles of reformed theology and their significance in current theological debate. Evaluation by assignment and paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT1101HF  L6101

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Online Course

Basic principles of reformed theology and their significance in current theological debate. Evaluation by assignment and paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1101HS  L6101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Online Course

Introduction to theology and the elements of Catholic theology. Revelation, Faith, Tradition, Church doctrine, infallibility, biblical inspiration. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Donald Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 6 · Max: 20
SMT1101HF  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
TRT1101HS  L0101

Systematic Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Offers an overview of the principles, resources, and central themes of Christian theology - revelation, the doctrines of the Trinity, the person and work of Jesus Christ, and humanity in relation to God. Discussion paper, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stephen J. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 213
RGT1101HF  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores the relationship between contemplation and action as a basis for theological reflection. Spirituality, faith, revelation, tradition, development of dogma, teaching office. Introduces Bernard Lonergan's "Method in Theology". Lectures, readings, bulletin board participation, discussion, written assignments.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Gordon Rixon
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT1101HF  L0101

The God of the Gospel: Systematic Theology I

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course provides an in-depth exploration of two central Christian doctrines - the Trinity and the person of Christ - as well as reflection on the role of Holy Scripture and the nature of theology. This is the first part of a two-part sequence in basic Christian doctrine. Lectures, tutorial discussions generated by students’ questions, question-and-answer period. Short papers, final take-home exam. Tutorial 10-11 a.m.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Timothy Connor
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1101HY  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Introduction to the nature, task and history of Roman Catholic Theology by a study of its sources: Revelation, Faith, Scripture (Canonicity, Inspiration, Inerrancy), Tradition, Magisterium, Development of Doctrine and Papal Infallibility. Also examined is the expression: "Outside the church there is no salvation". Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test. Preference given to St. Augustine’s Seminary Diaconate Formation Diploma students.

Schedule: Irregular · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: Weekends
Instructors: Francis G. Carpinelli
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Max: 23
Additional Notes: Diaconate Formation Program course
WYT1104HF  L0101

Foundations of Theological Inquiry

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will search the foundations of modern culture philosophically, sociologically, and theologically. What are the challenges and opportunities for faith in our world? It involves discussing several classic texts in colloquium. Method of evaluation: participation in class discussion, a paper, participation in a debate, a précis of a reading, and a take-home exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: George R. Sumner
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT1104HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/20

Foundations of Theological Inquiry

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course will examine the theological relationship between Christian ‘faith’ and ‘understanding’ by unpacking the philosophical foundations of our modern culture that influence the Church today and contrasting them to classical theological texts in the Christian tradition, in particular those of Augustine, Anselm, Calvin and Barth. Weekly discussion forums, short papers, final essay.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
WYT1105HF  L0101

Teaching the Faith: Introduction to Catechetical Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is designed for new students, and acts as an introduction to a number of central pastoral responsibilities: teaching the faith to new Christians, grasping the overall shape and purpose of Christian theology, assessing and meeting the demands of local culture and context, engaging the character of conversion and formation, and finally, grasping an overall shape to the history of Christian witness. The course pursues the historical examination of key catechetical texts from the New Testament to the contemporary period, analyzes their content and purpose, locates them historically, and seeks to engage students’ own comprehensive vision of the Gospel, its communication, and pastoral practice. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source reading. Extensive reading, discussion, and mastering of content. Weekly content quizzes; 3 papers (6-10 pages each); final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1710HF  L0101

Basic Logic for Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Intro to concepts and techniques of natural reasoning: recognizing and evaluating arguments, criteria of good arguments, definition, categorical and propositional logic, inductive reasoning. Lectures, weekly assignments, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
SAT1711HS  L6101

Introduction to Thomas Aquinas

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Online Course

This course is an introduction to the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), the most influential Catholic theologian of the last millennium. No previous knowledge of Aquinas or of philosophy is presumed. We will start by looking at Aquinas’ program of remaking Christian theology in light of the best philosophy and science of his day; then we will examine his views on human action, human nature, human knowing and philosophical theology.  Lectures, discussion, short papers and final exam. On-line discussion, book review, 2,000 word paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 20
SAT1901HF  L0101

Christian Ethics I

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Objective dimensions of morality: scripture, natural moral law, casuistry, faith and morality, magisterium, moral principles and norms, positive human law. Readings, lectures, discussions, short reflection papers and exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1902HS  L0101

Christian Ethics II

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Subjective dimensions of morality, conscience, freedom, responsibility, responsible human action, moral decision making, virtue. Lectures, discussions, readings, short reflection papers and exam. Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
SMT1904HF  L0101

Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Consideration of themes in fundamental moral theology required for a comprehensive understanding of the moral subject. Topics include: conscience, character, virtues, prudence, probabilism, freedom and responsibility, role of Christian community and magisterial teaching, sin and conversion, ecological ethics. Short papers. Adult learning process. Offered in alternate years.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
SMT1904HF  L0102

Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Consideration of themes in fundamental moral theology required for a comprehensive understanding of the moral subject. Topics include: conscience, character, virtues, prudence, probabilism, freedom and responsibility, role of Christian community and magisterial teaching, sin and conversion, ecological ethics. Short papers. Adult learning process. Offered in alternate years.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
SAT1905HS  L0101

Moral Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to Catholic moral theology: scripture, tradition, natural law, faith & morality; moral norms & virtue; conscience & magisterium. Lectures, readings, discussion, three assignments.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
RGT1905HF  L0101

Ethical Reflections on Pastoral Practice

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Basic principles of Christian ethics, with special attention to the pastoral application of moral theology. Case-study method used. Designed for Regis IFM students. Readings, lectures, seminar work, 3 short essays, final exam. Seminar work requires an additional one-hour commitment per week.

Schedule: Thursday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
WYT2101HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2009/12/08

The Bride of the Lamb: Systematic Theology II

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course explores the activity of God from creation to new creation, with special emphasis on the Spirit's work in the Church. We also examine the image of God in the human person and the nature of sin. This course presupposes Systematic Theology I.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT2101HS  L0101

The Bride of the Lamb: Systematic Theology II

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the activity of God from creation to new creation, with special emphasis on the Spirit's work in the Church. We also examine the image of God in the human person and the nature of sin. This course presupposes Systematic Theology I. Lectures, tutorial discussions generated by students

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Biblical, Biblical
TRT2111HF  L0101

Orthodox Iconology: Iconography in a Worship Context

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Training and sensitising students' eyes and minds to the Orthodox Way of understanding iconography. Iconology is a visual-liturgical theology, which teaches doctrine and promotes worship by ordering space and worship-function. Iconography is a rhetoric, not a "mystical spirituality." Attention to the development of critical skills for seeing/understanding, especially text-image relationships, and to iconological programming.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 340
SAT2222HS  L0101

Mystery of the Trinity

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of the Triune God with its biblical sources and Patristic development, and an examination of the development of the understanding of the Immanent Trinity, with attention paid to particular issues, e.g. Filioque, notion of 'Person'. Also stressed is the development of a Trinitarian spirituality with some attention to the mystics. Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gregory H. Carruthers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT2223HS  L0101

Mystery of the Triune God

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer. Lectures, discussions, short paper, final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
SAT2223HF  L0101

The Christian God

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines selective themes and fundamental questions in Trinitarian Theology from a Catholic perspective as found in the New Testament, Ecumenical Councils, the Fathers and Scholastics, and to some extent, in modern times. This prepares the ground for making a few important inquiries in light of contemporary concerns from a systematic perspective.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5
SAT2242HS  L4101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · St. Augustine's Aurora Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 18:30 to 20:30
Instructors: J. Chandrakanthan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT2242HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 12
WYT2307HS  L4101

Patterns of Life in the Spirit

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Dallas,TX Site

In this course we will study the most influential accounts of life in Christ that have appeared in the Western Church. Attention will be given to the theological foundations of these various accounts and to the practices that have given them their particular identity. Particular attention will be given to John Cassian, St. Augustine, St. Benedict, St. Thomas Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, and Thomas Cranmner.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2321HS  L0101

Creation, Man/Woman, Sin

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Christian doctrine of creation; its scriptural foundation in Old and New Testaments; its difference from Greek philosophical theories; its history to present; its relation to evolution; contemporary theories. Man/woman: their nature and relationship to God and the world as understood in history of Christian thought. Monogenism vs. polygenism. The problem of evil, original sin and sin of the world. Lectures and discussion. Paper.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2321HF  L0101

Creation/Anthropology/Sin

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of creation. The human person in its created existence in the image of Christ; origin of humankind. Doctrine of original sin. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5
SAT2331HS  L0101

Grace and Glory

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The new creation in Christ; God's universal salvific will, the mystery of Christian Justification, the new life in Christ within Church for the world. Eschatology. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2341HF  L0101

Eschatology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the teachings of the Christian Church and theological understanding concerning eschatology both as it has developed in the tradition and in the renewed interest it has gained from some of the significant theologians of the 20th C. Topics include: philosophical foundations, eschatology in the OT and NT, immortality and resurrection, theology of death and afterlife, individual and communal judgement, parousia, apocalyptic, political eschatology. Short paper, book review, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2401HS  L4101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · St. Augustine's Aurora Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 to 16:00
Schedule Notes: January 9, 30, February 20, March 27
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT2401HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination. Preference given to St. Augustine’s Seminary Diaconate Formation Diploma students.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT2401HY  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination. Preference given to St. Augustine

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Schedule Notes: Weekends
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 32
Additional Notes: Diaconate Formation Program course
SMT2402HF  L0101

Introduction to Liturgy

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the liturgical celebration, to its theology and praxis. Lectures. Readings, discussions, online exercises, class presentation, field observation, research paper.

Schedule: Monday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Christian McConnell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT2404HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Jesus' preaching of the reign of God; development of ecclesial structures; ministries in the church; mission, service, and witness in the Church today, contemporary issues leading to and arising from Vatican II. Lectures, discussions, research paper, take-home exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2431HF  L0101

Sacramental Theology I

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to sacraments in general, historical and systematic study of sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Vivian Ligo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
KNT2431HF  L0101

Church Ministry Sacraments: Presbyterian and Reformed Views

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A theological exploration of Church, Ministry and Sacraments from a Presbyterian perspective in dialogue with other traditions and contemporary expressions of the Christian movement. Assignment and Paper. Prerequisites: A basic introductory theology course. Knox M.Div. students need to have Ref. Theology in Dialogue.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2432HS  L0101

Sacramental Theology II

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical and systematic study of the sacraments of healing (penance and anointing of the sick) and sacraments of growth (marriage and orders) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2433HY  L0101

Sacraments

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological reflection on the sacramental life of the Church in the context or worship and education in sacramentality. Preference given to St. Augustine’s Seminary Diaconate Formation Diploma students.

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Schedule Notes: Weekends
Instructors: Vivian Ligo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 32
Additional Notes: Diaconate Formation Program course
WYT2502HF  L6101

Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · Online Course

A study of Anglican Theology, principally through the reading of texts from Anglican thinkers of the 16th and 17th centuries. Study and discussion of the foundational themes of the English Reformation, as well as the 17th century development. The two great renewal movements of the 18th and 19th centuries: the evangelical movement and the Anglo-Catholic movement. The modern criticisms of the Anglican tradition. The question of Anglican identity and authority.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Smith
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Historical
TRT2504HF  L0101

Early Fathers/Mothers: Eastern Thought, Doctrine and Theology to 431

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the primary texts of the Church's first five centuries from the perspective of Eastern Christians, to identify and apply the vision of God and persons forged by the early doctors of the Church. Close readings of primary texts. Research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:30 to 21:30
Instructors: Maria-Fotini Polidoulis-Kapsalis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 340
WYT2505HS  L0101

Introduction to Anglican Theology: Ways of Reading the Bible in the English Church and Anglican Communion

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a survey course in Anglican theology that will involve extensive reading. Using the lens of Scriptural interpretation as a way of approaching the sweep of Anglican theological thinking, this course will survey chronologically a broad range Anglican readers of Scripture in an attempt to gauge the development of the larger religious vision of Anglicanism over time. Beginning with Wycliffe, the course will move through a number of writers into the early 20th century, and end with some recent statements on the reading of Scripture from around the Anglican Communion. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source readings. Weekly content quizzes; midterm; final exam. Tutorial: 4-5pm.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2600HY  L0101

Theological Anthropology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Exploration of the following themes in the light of Christian revelation: creation, community, body & soul, humanity as male and female, sin, grace, eschatology. Lectures, readings, presentations, final exam. Preference given to St. Augustine’s Seminary Diaconate Formation Diploma students.

Schedule: 0:00 to 0:00
Schedule Notes: Weekends
Instructors: Vivian Ligo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 32
Additional Notes: Diaconate Formation Program course
SAT2601HF  L4101

Ecumenism

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · St. Augustine's Aurora Site

Explores historical sources of division among Christian churches, origins of the modern ecumenical movement, the commitment of the Roman Catholic Church to Christian unity, growing agreement in sacramental life. Special attention to implications for catechesis and pastoral care of inter-church families.

Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 to 16:00
Schedule Notes: Sept. 12, 19, Oct. 31 and Nov. 28
Instructors: Mary Marrocco
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5
TRT2607HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/01/06

African Traditional Religion

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is designed to introduce and guide reflection on morality and ethics from the perspective of African religion. An in-depth study of the rich heritage of African Religion with emphasis on how they continue to influence and mediate the experiences of contemporary Africans. The course centers on aspects of African Religion including afro-theism (God), ontology (human) and cosmology (nature). One 5-7 page reflection paper (30%); one 15-20 page research paper (50%); class participation (10%); class atttendance (10%).

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRT2611HS  L6101

Twentieth Century Anglican Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Online Course

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with some of the theological trends and voices characterizing Anglican theology in the twentieth century, as well as to consider how these voices and movements can be integrated into contemporary pastoral and ministerial practice. Theologians to be studied include: Gore, Underhill, Temple, Mascall, Pittenger, Macquarrie, Sykes, Heyward, Tutu, Williams, and others. Theological trends will include modernism, spirituality, liturgical renewal, Anglo-Catholicism, process thought, incarnation, feminism, political and liberation theology, etc. The course will conclude with a consideration of future trends in Anglican theology. Weekly readings, two short essays, class presentation.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Matthew P. Cadwell
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT2621HF  L0101

An Introduction to Asian Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The purpose of this course is to recognize themes and insights that are developed uniquely by Asian theologians, mainly from China, Japan, and Korea, such as C.S. Song, Kosuke Koyama, and Korean Minjung Theologians. This course will help non-Asian students to get some knowledge of Asian cultures and Asian indigenous religions, and Asian students to develop a theology based on their Asian heritages and experiences. Consequently, "Asian Theology" will help theological students to transcend Western parochialism and contribute to a development of Christian theology for the coming multicultural and pluralistic century we have been already embarked. The course will be in seminar format with lecture input, analysis of readings, student presentation and class discussion. Prerequisite: A basic introductory theology course.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Chun Hoi Heo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT2701HF  L0101

Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Survey of some basic issues in natural theology: religious experience, faith and reason, problem of evil, petitionary prayer, etc. Readings from ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
SMT2702HF  L0101

Introduction to Epistemology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction for theology students to basic questions of nature, scope, and limits of knowledge. Central questions of belief, certainty and truth will also be investigated. Teaching Method: Lectures & Discussions. Means of Evaluation: 2 essays: each essay a 6 to 8 page critical evaluation of Philosophical problem. 1 two hour cumulative in class test (last class)N.B. Each is worth 33 1/3%

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT2705HS  L0101

Philosophical Anthropology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is an introduction to the basic problems in the philosophy of mind. the most important questions studied will be the debate between Dualists and Materialists; the nature of Self-Consciousness; the nature of the Self; Artificial Intelligence and questions of Personal Identity and the Survival of Death. Teaching Methods: Lecture/Class Discussions Means of Evaluation: 2 essays: each essay a 6 to 8 page critical evaluation of a Philosophical Topic (each essay worth 30%), one 2-hour in-class cumulative test (worth 30% )Two short argument summaries of 2 pages each (5% for each summary).

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Jean-Pierre Fortin
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2706HS  L0101

Introduction to Metaphysics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A philosophical examination of some fundamental topics in Christian metaphysics: creation, causality, the problem of evil, and freedom of the will. Readings taken from "classical" Christian theologians such as Augustine, Aquinas and Luther and also from contemporary sources. Lectures, discussions, short papers and final exam.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 12
SAT2707HS  L0101

Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of three different approaches to ethics. First, we will look at the foundations of Western morality through reading Plato's Gorgias; second, at Nietzsche's attack on Western morality in Beyond Good & Evil; and third at Aquinas' treatment of the virtues. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 12
RGT2712HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/03

Theology as Biography

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Investigation of the relationship between biography and theological reflection. Summary of foundations for such presuppositions rooted in Lonergan's claim that "objectivity is the fruit of authentic subjectivity." Also looks at paradigmatic examples from Christian history, e.g. St. Augustine. The life and thought of Thomas Merton will be emphasized and such personalities as Simone Weil, Catherine de Heuck-Doherty and Dorothy Day. Short paper, book review, biography project, class participation.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 12 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
SAT2723HF  L0101

Western Philosophy I

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A focused study of philosophers and representative texts in the western philosophical tradition. Part I: historical development from pre-Socratics to Aquinas: metaphysics, theory of knowledge, human nature and ethics. Lectures, discussion, short expository papers, final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
SAT2725HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/09/11

Introduction to Existentialism

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to existentialism through the works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre and Marcel. Topics include: the existence or non-existence of God and its implications for morality; subjectivity; individuality; and choice. Lectures, discussions, short papers, and final exam.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
EMT2902HF  L0102 · Cancelled on 2009/06/02

Christian Ethics in Context

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course assists students in acquiring greater skill and confidence in doing theo-ethical reflection, especially within the context of Christian life and ministry in an ever complex world. As a practical and integrative discipline of the church living in particular contexts, this course attends to identifications (who am I/are we?) and method (what am I/are we to do?) for seeking right relations and naming sources of hope. Lectures, short essays, final issue or integration paper. Prerequisites: basic courses in Bible, and history of Christianity or theology.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
EMT2902HF  L0101

Christian Ethics in Context

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is an introduction to the content, methods, and practices of Christian ethics.  We (the Teaching Team) intend to provide students with an introduction to select key voices, in the recent past and present, in Christian ethics and to some tools for doing moral reflection/action with some attention to poverty and ecological destruction as moral issues.  We hope to encourage students to refine the ethical awareness that they bring to a variety of moral challenges, within their lives, within the churches, and within society.  Lectures, small group discussions; analysis of a moral argument; figure paper; final integrative project on wealth and poverty.  Prerequisites: Introductory Bible and Theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:00 to 20:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT2912HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/19

The Drama of Christian Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Christian ethics, not as a cerebral and academic discipline but as a lived, embodied Christian reality. It is designed with the intent of providing the student with a framework through which to understand what it means to live as the church within the complexities of the social, moral, and political world of the 21st century. The themes of drama, narrative, acting, and especially “improvisation” provide the conceptual lens through which we will engage various ethical complexities such as genetic/bio-ethical issues, sexuality, family and marriage, pacifism and war, or ecological ethics. This will be an online course with a written lecture format, weekly readings, student participation in weekly discussion questions, one minor assignment, and a final major paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Patrick McManus
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
TRT2942HF  L0101

Ethics and Society

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The primary goal of this course is to help us think critically and sensitively about Christian values, norms, and commitments in ways that preserve a Christian orientation while taking into account the non-Christian and pluralistic context of modern society. Such thinking will involve a dialectical process where universal principles, values, and norms will be examined with reference to the particular experiences and realities that constrain human action and interaction. The aim is not to structure a strict formalistic ethical framework but rather to canvall various ethical methodologies, religious and secular, as resources for ethical thinking and praxis. Method of Evaluation: Critical book response(s), one term paper; class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity College, Room TC24
TRT2951HF  L0101

Twentieth Century Canadian Political Theologies

Offered in Summer 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will consider, in the Canadian context, how the influential Christian political theologies of the 20th century such as the Social Gospel, Christian socialism, liberation theology and their conservative counterpoints might inform a Christian political theology for the 21st century. We will examine how these theologies actually shaped 20th century Canada through the work and lives of such Christians as Tommy Douglas, Ted Scott, Pierre Trudeau, George Grant and others. We will also consider the political role of the Canadian churches.

Schedule: 1800 to 2000 · Begins: 05/13 · Ends: 06/24
Schedule Notes: Tuesdays and Thursdays
Instructors: David Neelands, John Brewin
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Withdrawal Date:  May 26
3000 Level Courses
RGT3115HS  L0101

Vatican II: The Theology and Historical Context of the Documents

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will study the documents of the Second Vatican Council with a view to understanding their theological foundations, their histroical context and development, and their pastoral implications for today's church. 5-page paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SAT3181HF  L0101

Theological Integration

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

For final year students, a comprehensive and synthetic review of Roman Catholic doctrine in Systematic Theology. Personal appropriation of the mysteries of faith as well as effective pastoral explanation and communication of these mysteries is also stressed. Seminar presentations and final oral exam. Contact professor for summer reading material.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
TRT3210HF  L0101

Three-Personed God

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Study of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, as presented from a variety of perspectives: patristic, modern and feminist, with special consideration of implications for the concept of "person". Students will be asked to engage assigned readings in classroom discussions. Discussion paper, extended essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stephen J. Reynolds
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 213
WYT3215HS  L0101

The Image of God

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of different perspectives on the Imago Dei and its implications for theological anthropology. Special attention to the contributions of theologians from both Eastern Orthodox and the West including Gregory of Nyssa, St. Augustine, Thomas a Kempis, Barth, Volf, Zizioulas, and Lossky. Seminar format. Reflection papers, final paper. Restricted to Wycliffe M.Div. Honours students.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Peter Robinson
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 8
TRT3227HF  L0101

Trinity & Scripture: Theological and Exegetical Renewal of the Christian Doctrine of God

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines the recovery and renewal of Trinitarian doctrine and theology since the turn of the twentieth century with a broad focus upon Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox theologians; the reexamination of the doctrine’s sources in Scripture through theological exegesis and current trends in its formulations. The course will proceed along a lecture / discussion format, with readings from relevant literature. Assignments will include short reflection papers and a research paper.

AD students enrol in TRT6227HF.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Kurt Anders Richardson
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 340

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Course Description TRT3227HF Trinity & Scripture (Richardson) revised August 5 2009.pdf33.64 KB
RGT3243HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course invites the student to study the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's Christological reflection. Students are helped to develop a systematic understanding of the person and work of Jesus Christ, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the Christian tradition for pastoral leadership. Reading assignments, short papers, oral exam. Seminar work may require an additional one-hour commitment per week.

AD students enrol in RGT6243HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT3249HF  L0101

Christology & the Quest for the Historical Jesus

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores the status of traditional doctrines of Christ in light of the scholarly movements to define Jesus "as he really was," and thus to develop a Christology without a theological agenda. Lectures, assigned readings, classroom discussion. Reflection papers, extended essay or book report.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stephen J. Reynolds
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 214
KNT3271HS  L0101

Doctrines of Reconciliation

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Critical assessment of the most important and formative theories with particular reference to those that have shaped reformed perspectives. Lectures and group discussion. Evaluation by essay. Prerequisites: A basic introductory theology course plus another theology course. Knox students should have completed Church, Ministry, Sacraments.

AD students enrol in KNT6271HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3320HF  L0101

Doing Justice with Spirit

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological perspectives and spiritual practices for integrating faith and the work for justice, peace and a healthy environment. Evaluation by essay.

AD students enrol in RGT6320HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes: Max 25 (AD & BD)
EMT3344HS  L0101

Creation and Eschatology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Will the universe be destroyed and discarded, or redeemed and transformed with God's consummation of all things? This course considers these and related questions by examining the biblical and philosophical foundations for Christian reflections on the beginning and end of the world; significant historical and contemporary theological contributions (e.g., early Christian apologists, Irenaeus, Augustine, Calvin, Barth, Moltmann, Pannenberg, Ruether, McFague); the significance of the resurrection of Jesus Christ; the influence of modern and postmodern scientific thought, ecological consciousness, and religious pluralism; and the role of apocalyptic thought in contemporary culture. Lectures, class discussion, required and recommended reading, mid-term and final paper. Prerequisite: two courses in systematic theology.

AD students enrol in EMT6344HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3352HS  L0101

Theology of the Spiritual Exercise

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Karl Rahner maintained that the theology of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius had yet to be fully explored. This research seminar will attempt to make some contribution to the task. There will be a detailed analysis of the text to identify the theological issues contained therein. The work of Karl Rahner and Hans Urs von Balthasar will provide additional commentary. Contemporary biblical scholarship, certain reinterpretations and the theological anthropology of John Paul II will provide relevant dialogue partners. Participation is by permission of the professor, preference will be given to those who have made the Spiritual Exercises.

AD students enrol in RGT6352HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Previously taught at the 5000 level.
SMT3370HS  L0101

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practical integration

AD students enrol in SMT6370HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
RGT3404HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/11/24

Communion Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A sampling of various modern approaches to communion ecclesiology in Western Christian and Eastern Orthodox theologians. History of communion ecclesiology and its relationship to ecumenism. Lectures, seminars, synthesis papers, research paper. Prerequisite: Two introductory courses in Theology.

AD students enrol in RGT6404HS.

Schedule: Friday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TXT3408HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/21

Sacramental Theology: Baptism, Eucharist, and other Signs of the Gospel

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A course which explores the theological rationale of sacraments, with special attention given to Anglican perspectives on the nature of sacraments in general, as well as their relation to the life and mission of the Church. Students will engage the sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist both as specific church practices and in their relation to one another. Students will be expected to read a range of representative authors and texts, both Anglican and non-Anglican. Lecture and seminar discussion. Four short discussion papers (or two extended essays). Final viva voce examination.

AD students enrol in TXT6408HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina, Stephen J. Reynolds
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT3411HS  L0101

Theology of the Holy Spirit

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of the biblical, historical, liturgical, spiritual, and theological perspectives on the Holy Spirit. This course provides an overview of the development of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. It also aims at highlighting the relevance and centrality of pneumatology in all areas of theology. Method: required readings, seminar discussions, lectures. Evaluation: participation, seminar leadership, short assignment, research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT3412HF  L0101

Confessing Our Faith

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Study of the doctrine section of the United Church of Canada Basis of Union and other statements of faith; appreciative and critical discussion with the goal of contemporary/contextual theological expression. Recommended for students in their final (post-internship) year of studies. Small and large group discussion, required and recommended reading, five short papers and one final paper. Prerequisites: Old Testament I, New Testament I, Theology I or their equivalents, or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3436HF  L0101

Sacramental Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, reconciliation, anointing of the sick, orders, and marriage as symbols of the world, challenge to human existence, life functions of the Church and features of Christology and revelation. Lectures, seminars, mid-term papers and final paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
EMT3451HF  L0101

Mission and Religious Pluralism

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Taking into account recent paradigm shifts in the theology of mission, this course invites participants to consider the relationship of mission to biblical sources, culture and context, unity and diversity in the church, post-colonism and intercultural engagement, and especially religious pluralism. The goal is to foster critical theological reflection on how the church might best understand and embody its mission in a multifaceted and globalizing world situation today. Methodology: lecutres/discussions. Evaluations are based upon a mid-term paper, final research paper, and class participation. Prerequisite: Completion of first credit group or Level II.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT3471HF  L0101

Mariology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

The Christological-Trinitarian foundation of Mary's role in salvation history and in the Church is developed in two areas: 1) the foundations from Vatican II, Scripture, Church Fathers, and the four Marian Dogmas; 2) the celebration of Mary in liturgy, popular piety, and spirituality. Finally, Mary is studied in light of ecumenism, and in one contemporary theologian and twentieth-century developments for her profound significance for today. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination. The course is held at 2661 Kingston Road location.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
WYT3501HF  L0101

History of Modern European Christian Thought -- 1600-1800

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

AD students enrol in WYT6501HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3552HF  L0101

Aquinas on the Spiritual Life

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on Aquinas' Summa Theologiae and its systematic theology of the Christian life: faith, hope and love are the foundational principles that ground the concrete living out of the imitatio Christi in a life of prayer, service, preaching and leadership in the Church. Importance of philosophical, rhetorical and historical tools for reading the text. Weekly reading, weekly papers, term paper, participation in class discussion.

AD students enrol in RGT6552HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
RGT3553HS  L0101

Aquinas on the Incarnation

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A text based seminar examining Aquinas' theology of the Incarnation in the Summa Theologiae. Students will develop critical reading skills and familiarity with the grammatical, rhetorical and dialectical dimensions of Aquinas' systematics. Basic Degree: Short papers, reading assignments, major paper. Advanced degree: three shorter papers, classroom presentation, reading assignments, major research paper.

AD students enrol in RGT6553HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT3566HF  L0101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

AD students enrol in TRT6566HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity College, Room TC24
TRT3566HF  L6101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Online Course

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3571HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2010/01/08

Method in Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Reading and discussion of Bernard Lonergan's "Method in Theology." Lectures and seminars, written assignments. Offered in alternate years. AD students enrol in RGT5578HS.

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gordon Rixon
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3581HF  L0101

Hans Urs von Balthasar

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inspiring and profound are terms often attributed to the theology of von Balthasar. Benedict XVI said of his work, "His theological reflection maintains intact, to this day, a profound timeliness and leads many to penetrate ever more into the profoundity of the mystery of faith". This course begins an exploration of his work. There is consideration of the Trilogy: Herrlichkeit, Theo-Drama and Theo-Logic; the influence of Ignatius Loyola and Adrienne von Speyr; and the place of Mary. Not a course for the faint-hearted, von Balthasar's work is at times dense and complex but the rewards are beyond price. Prerequisite: one year of theology, at least three theology courses.

AD students enrol in RGT6581HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT3602HF  L0101

New Voices in Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In recent decades hosts of “new” voices have joined and vastly expanded theological dialogue: African Americans, women, and “Third World”–Latin American, South African, Filipino, Indian, Sri Lankan, Korean, etc.  More recently indigenous, Hispanic American, womanist, gay and lesbian, mujerista/Latina, Asian-American and Asian-Canadian, and ecological voices are expanding the dialogues.  And the number of new and newer voices continues to grow.  We will: trace the early history of dialogues among these new voices and sample more recent voices; identify points of convergence and divergence; examine hermeneutical and methodological issues concerning experience, standpoints, perspectives; probe the riches of diversity, the dangers of relativism and new grounds for authenticity and authority; explore new theological frontiers in (re)discovering/recentering theology in the Spirit and reconceiving history; survey the challenges and opportunities confronting theology and the church accompanying the eruptions of new voices in a rapidly changing world, and the struggles over the future. Readings, class participation, short papers, and (for AD students) research paper - adult learning process.

AD students enrol in SMT6602HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Lee F. Cormie
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT3608HF  L0101

New Directions in Magisterial Teaching

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Recent teaching of the Roman Catholic magisterium on war and peace, social teaching about justice, ecumenical dialogue, nonchristian religions, and women. This course provides an update on important new directions in Catholic magisterial teaching on these five topics. The course examines the varying authority of different magisterial documents and focuses on methods of interpretation. Auditors welcome. Lectures, discussions, paper, take-home exam.

AD students enrol in SMT6608HF.

Schedule: Monday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT3617HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/31

Islam: History, Doctrine, and Practice

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course serves as an introduction to the highly relevant Islamic faith and culture. It will cover the historical evolution as its doctrine and life. Beginning with its emergence with the Prophet, his revelation and early community, its spread under the caliphs, the fixation of the Qu’ran, and its subsequent historical development: the Umayyad, Abbasid, Famitid, Mamluk, Ottoman, and contemporary periods. Alongside this historical aspect, a systematic reflection on the main principles of Islamic faith, its theology and piety, its life, observances and festivals, and not least, its interaction with other religions in the modern world, chiefly Christianity, will be engaged. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

AD students enrol in SMT6617HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical, Pastoral Theology
SMT3642HS  L0101

Issues in Christian-Jewish Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Since Vatican II Catholic Christians have been encouraged to establish and sustain friendly and fruitful relationships with Jews. This course explores some major issues affecting the Christian-Jewish dialogue. They include anti-Judaism and the New Testament; Church Fathers; Christian persecution of Jews; theological issues such as the unity of God, anthropology, the Messiah, Torah; covenant theories; theological significance of Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; Jewish views on Jesus Christ and Christianity; Christian approaches to Judaism; official Roman Catholic-Jewish Dialogue. Method: required readings, lectures, seminars. Evaluation: participation, seminar leadership, short assignment, research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT3643HS  L0101

Theology of Religions and Interfaith Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces the major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam in detail and also others in brief) of the world -- their historical setting, basic principles, significant features, Holy Scriptures, theology, etc -- and a Christian perspective on them with an urgency to enter into interfaith dialogue and peaceful coexistence.

Schedule: Friday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephrem Nariculam
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
WYT3651HF  L0101

The Theologies of Luther and Calvin

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course of lectures will examine Luther's writings on the theology of the cross and on human freedom; and Calvin's writings on Scripture and the Christian life. Weekly readings; a final examination (oral or written).

AD students enrol in WYT6651HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SMT3653HS  L0101

Interpreting Contemporary Christianity

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces students into a creative dialogue between African and Western Christianity. We shall concentrate on Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa (East, West, and Southern Africa), and Christianity in Quebec, the rest of Canada, United States, and Ireland. Topics to be covered include: the Western missionary factor in African Christianity, trends in African Christianity, emerging African theologies, the social context of faith in Africa, and the contribution of African Christianity to the nature and shape of contemporary Christianity. The course will also engage the reality of a post-Western Christianity and post-Christian Western societies for the practice of the faith and theologies in Canada, the US and Ireland. In addition, the course will examine the dynamics of Christianity in Canada, USA, and Ireland as representative countries in Western Christianity, and the possibility of a mutual dialogue and penetration between African and Western Christianity. The course will answer the following questions: What has African Christianity gained from Western Christianity? What is the present state of the Christian faith in sub-Saharan Africa? What are the problems and challenges facing African Christianity and what tools can be developed from mission studies to meet them? What can African Christianity teach Western Christianity? What can Western Christianity teach African Christianity? What are the dynamics of Christian contraction in Canada, the USA and Ireland as representatives of a post-Christian West, and a post-Western Christianity?

The course has a missional and ecumenical orientation, and will adopt a hermeneutical and practical methodology as well as quantitative and qualitative pedagogical approaches. The course is interdisciplinary and could be listed in the theological department and will be cross-listed to historical and pastoral departments.

Each student will be required to write an analysis of an article or book from the course bibliography (25%), a position paper for a seminar presentation (25%), and a major research paper (50%). The seminar presentation will be based on a practical pastoral challenge or problematic which the student brings up from the course material or his or her Christian tradition.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SMT3670HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/04/16

Thought of Vatican II

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Studies the documents and teachings of Vatican II. Brief overview of the historical background to the Council and to Councils in the life of the church. Seminars guide discussions based on close readings of the 16 documents with emphasis on the historical context and ecclesiological significance of each document. Seminar presentations; participation in analysis of the documents; integration paper.

AD students enrol in SMT6670HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 25 · Crosslisted to: Historical
EMT3672HS  L0101

Theology, Violence, and Peace

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores theological reflection in relation to violence and peace, particularly in Christian traditions. Theories of violence and non-violence as well as case studies from the past and present will provide the means to investigate the ways faith-based claims justify or promote enmity and hostility and/or hospitality and peacemaking in Christian practice. Attention may be given to violence/peace in connection with theologies of revelation and atonement; justice/love; gender, race, ethnicity, class, and disability; Empire and globalization processes; interfaith relations with Jewish, Muslim, and Canadian Aboriginal communities; and the possibility of forgiveness and reconciliation. Lectures, discussions, journal exercises, book review, presentation, and final research paper.

AD students enrol in EMT6672HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD 8; BD 16)
ICT3702HF  L0101

Religion, Life and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the "Amsterdam School" of neo-Calvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and other schools of thought.

AD students enrol in ICT6702HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3706HS  L0101

Ignatian Contribution to Contemporary Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course evaluates the Ignatian contribution to comtemporary ecclesiology. Utilizing key texts it situates Ignatius' sense of "Church" and the Society of Jesus relationship to the Church. Explores key issues and potential problems faced by a twenty-first-century reader of Ignatius. Engagement with contemporary Jesuit theologians, and the writings of Pope John Paul II and Cardinal Ratzinger. Mid-term paper, research paper, oral exam, class participation.

AD students enrol in RGT6706HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
ICT3716HF  L0101

Wittgenstein: Language & the Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2005 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Wittgenstein’s philosophy continues to generate enormous interest, and his name is frequently cited in connection with radical developments in theology and the philosophy of religion. Via an exploration of the different accounts of language and meaning he presents in both his early and later work, this course will focus on his thought as it relates to religious belief and commitment in particular.

AD students enrol in ICT6716HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3730HS  L0101

The Divine (At) Risk? Open Theism, Classical Theism and Beyond

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2005 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Did God take a risk in creating the world? How are divine and human freedom related? Can we confess God’s sovereignty in the face of evil? This course will explore the different ways in which the God of history is viewed by advocates and critics of “Open Theism.” Our examination will stimulate our own reflections on how we might best understand and, indeed, image God’s love, knowledge and power.

AD students enrol in ICT6730HS.

Schedule: Monday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3732HS  L0101

Imagining the World with Ricoeur

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will focus on two of Ricoeur’s essay collections, From Text to Action and Figuring the Sacred. Students will explore the general shape of Ricoeur’s heremeneutical phenomenology, including such themes as textual interpretation, action, explanation, understanding, ideology, and utopia. From there, the course will focus on Ricoeur’s thoughts concerning the disclosive force of religious texts in particular, including his understanding of the way Christian communities might best face the task of appropriating a textual heritage from which time has distanced them, and concerning which they may have lost a certain original naivety. Imagining the world with Ricoeur, we will discuss how his recommendations contribute to our effort to find meaning and inspiration amidst the crises and fragmentations that run through contemporary life. Course evaluation is weighted as follows: Class participation: 20%; Seminar Leadership: 30%; Paper: 50%.

AD students enrol in ICT6732HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3743HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

The Self and Its Others: Identity, Difference, and Responsibility

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the notion that subjectivity is not merely given but produced through an encounter with society, language and other selves. It explores the ethical and political consequences of this possibility. It examines the construction of ethnic, religious, racial, and gendered difference, the forces that have constituted them as ""other"" instead of the "same," and the consequences this has for the construction of the self and its obligations and responsibilities.

AD students enrol in ICT6743HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3775HF  L0101

Deconstruction and Politics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the uneasy relationship between deconstruction and politics. We will begin the course by familiarizing ourselves with Jacques Derrida's deconstuctive method, and continue by reading his work on issues of justice, law, cosmopolitanism, ethics, and the right to philosophy. The rest of the course will be spent engaging with various contemporaries of Derrida for whom his work in deconstruction and political philosophy has been important: Drucilla Cornell, Giorgio Agamben, Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari.

AD students enrol in ICT6775HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:30 to 14:30
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT3776HS  L0101

Feminist Social Thought

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore current contributions to the field of feminist social thought. We will read from figures such as Gloria Anzaldu, Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, Nancy Fraser, and Chandra Mohanty on various ways of understanding the relationships between gendered identities and sociopolitical states of affairs.

AD students enrol in ICT6776HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3790YY  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: Full Year · Two Credits
RGT3790YS  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · Two Credits
RGT3790YF  L0101

MTS Synthesis Paper

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

MTS Synthesis Paper

Schedule: · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · Two Credits
WYT3805HS  L0101

Postmodernity and a Christian Worldview

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Postmodernity as a cultural phenomenon, implications in various areas of cultural endeavour (including politics, philosophy, psychology, theology, the arts, and science), and work toward an integral Christian worldview that gives guidance in a post-modern world. A particular concern will be to plumb the resources of Scripture for such a cultural context.

AD students enrol in WYT6805HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3829HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Theologies of Art: Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Format: lectures, readings and discussions. Evaluation: class participation, presentation and a final paper.

AD students enrol in ICT6829HS.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT3836HS  L0101

Theology of Music

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the key theological, mystical and philosophical notions of music that are of essential significance in relation to the history of Christian music from ancient to modern. Topics covered will include the relations of music and language, music and morality, music and monasticism, music and magic, the connection of music, body and spirit, and the musical syncretism of the so-called secular and the sacred. Class participation, major essay, final examination.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors:
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 340
WYT3855HF  L0101

Theology of Culture

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Investigating the faith/culture relationship from the perspective of worldview analysis, this course seeks to engender a cultural discernment rooted in a radical biblical faith. Lectures and seminars, reflection papers.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT3863HF  L0101

Christianity & World Religions

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the contemporary world, ecumenism must include dialogue between Christianity and world religions. This course will examine not only Christian attitudes to world religions, but also attitudes of world religions to other belief systems. Lectures, discussion, paper.

AD students enrol in RGT6863HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
SMT3866HS  L0101

New Heaven / New Earth

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A variant reading of the Genesis story of creation and fall speaks of the process of humans’ maturing, becoming like God, in their knowledge of good and evil and capacities to act, and the implications–for good and ill–of their choices for all of creation.  This reading seems especially challenging today in the midst of debates about the direction and control of scientific research, the development of promising and frightening new technologies, conflicts over “globalization,” and growing gaps between rich and poor.  These debates are filled with images of God-like powers of discovery and invention, fantastic new technologies, medical miracles, unlimited progress, and a new golden era of affluence and ease; some even point to the emergence of humanly-engineered successor species and a transhuman or posthuman future.  At the same time, these debates are haunted with images of widening gaps in incomes and wealth, growing suffering, deepening turmoil and chaos, apocalypse.  Through seminars on significant debates about  knowledge explosions, new technologies, multiple and uneven globalization(s), and alternative futures, and re-readings of biblical texts, we will probe the specifically theological/spiritual dimensions of these debates, with special reference to images of “playing God,” de-creation and re-creation or Genesis II, transcendence through technology, and hope that “another world is possible.” Readings, class participation, short papers, and (for AD students) research paper - adult learning process.

AD students enrol in SMT6866HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Lee F. Cormie
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT3878HS  L0101

Towards a Christian Political Economy: The Writings of Bob Goudzwaard

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Bob Goudzwaard has been a leading Christian political economist in the Netherlands for the last forty years. Professor Emeritus of the Free University of Amsterdam, former member of parliament, advisor to political parties, think tanks and NGO’s around the world, Goudzwaard has had a profound influence in shaping a Christian political-economic imagination. In this course we will read Goudzwaard’s most important books and articles (in translation) and have the opportunity to spend four seminars in conversation with him while he is in Toronto in January and February. Lectures, seminars, student seminars. Means of evaluation: Seminar participation, presentations and major essay.

AD students enrol in TRT6878HS.

Schedule: Monday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT3902HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/04/15

Ethical Issues in Christian Leadership

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will survey ethical issues encountered by both Christian leaders and leaders in Christian institutions as well as the styles and theories of leadership and models for effective decision-making that might be employed. The course will use a combination of lectures, discussions and student led seminars. Evaluation: participation, seminar presentation, case analysis, integration paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Room 207, Faculty of Theology, 95 St. Joseph Street
SMT3925HS  L0101

Justice:Indiv/Social

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Case study approach to justice in speech and communication, economic transactions, duties of employers and employees, professional ethics, etc. Case study presentation by students. Prerequisite: fundamental ethics or equivalent.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
WYT3927HF  L0101

Ethics of Wealth and Poverty

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will begin with a summation of Biblical teaching about wealth and poverty, and the succeeding sessions will study diverse interpretations of that teaching in the history of Christian thought. Attention will be paid to the historical context of the theology under study, including contemporary ethical teaching and economic practice. The goals of the course will be to appreciate the paradoxical character of Biblical teaching on wealth and poverty, as well as the diverse ways in which theologies on wealth and poverty have reflected the impact of socio-economic change. The value of the study will be its assisting students to cope with 21st century challenges in its uneven regional and social distribution of wealth and poverty.

AD students enrol in WYT6927HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Reginald Stackhouse
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT3932HF  L0101

Sexuality & Marriage

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Basis of sexuality and marriage in a Christian context and selected issues in these fields. Readings, lectures, discussions, paper, final exam. Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Jeanne Cover
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5
SAT3932HS  L0101

Sexuality & Marriage

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Basis of sexuality and marriage in a Christian context and selected issues in these fields. Readings, lectures, discussions, paper, final exam. Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT3934HS  L0101

Good Sex: Sexuality in Ethical Perspective

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

To deepen awareness of personal, social, cultural, and religious dimensions of sexuality, especially as these affect selfhood and community, this course explores the meaning and requirements of sexual justice for churches and civil society. Students will aim to frame a constructive Christian sexual ethic. Seminar presentations, book review and major paper.

AD students enrol in EMT6934HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT3942HF  L0101

Papal Teaching on Social Justice

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical survey of papal thought from Leo XIII's emphasis on workers' rights to John Paul II's focus on the broader theme of human rights. Reflection papers and book report, or major paper, exam. Prerequisite: Introductory course in moral theology.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas Lynch
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT3952HF  L0101

Bioethics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Morality of human conduct with regard to life issues. New reproductive technologies, abortion, healthcare problems, euthanasia and concepts of the person, etc. Lectures, readings, discussions, short reflection papers, final exam. Prerequisites: Fundamental Christian Ethics.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5
SMT3952HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/15

Contemporary Issues in Biomedical Ethics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Using contemporary articles from the biological and medical sciences, philosophical ethics, and magisterial teachings, the course will develop and apply critical thinking to contemporary issues in biomedical ethics including: issues pertaining to the creation of life (e.g., IV fertilization, reproductive technologies, surrogacy, stem cell research), the preservation of life (e.g., right to care, refusal of care, micro & macroallocation of limited resources, informed choice), and the end of life (e.g., euthanasia, allowing to die, elder neglect). Methods: lectures, discussions. Evaluation: response paper, integration paper, class participation.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 20
SMT3955HS  L0101

Approaches to Ecological Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will consider issues and documents that will help the student to develop an understanding of the ecological crisis as well as ethical and theological responses to it. Topics will include: the new cosmology; ecofeminism; the limitations of a human-centred ethics; issues of economic, social, and gender justice; and environmental-human health issues. Short papers; integration paper.

AD students enrol in SMT6955HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT3959HF  L0101

Ecological Consciousness & Cultural Value

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The environmental crisis is a spiritual crisis. The social dialectic, that is, practicality/instrumentality in tension with the intersubjective component of community, has become a skewed global phenomenon primarily because of technological/communications, economic, and political realities, along with the consequences of massive human migration and environmental destruction. What are cultural values and ultimately, religious values, that can redirect the social order toward a renewed human community living harmoniously/authentically with earth and cosmos? The structure of converted ecological consciousness, incarnating cultural values informed by Transcendent value, can evoke a humble, blessed way of "walking on the earth." Teaching method: Lecture. Evaluation: Class participation, special topic presentation, final paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Cora Twohig-Moengangongo
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
EMT3967HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/12/02

Community & Ethics in the City

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the importance and challenges of community in contemporary Christian ethics. It examines the relation between theo-ethical reflection and social location, including one’s own and students will clarify their stances through engaging a range of  perspectives. We will do close readings of selected texts, develop skills to discern and evaluate various proposals and approaches, and give special attention to implications for shaping ecclesiologies and ministries in a postmodern, globalized world.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT3991HS  L0101

Questions in Sexual Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Readings in contemporary concerns in Roman Catholic sexual ethics and their systematic development. Permission of professor is required.

AD students enrol in RGT6991HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
5000 Level Courses
SMT5210HF  L0101

Augustine, Aquinas, Lonergan

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course investigates certain key developments regarding God in the theological tradition of Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, and Bernard Lonergan. The focus is three topics: God as knowable by natural reason, God as manifested by supernatural revelation, and the psychological analogy for the Trinity. Readings include appropriate sections of Augustine's Confessions and On the Trinity, Aquinas' Summa theologiae, and Lonergan's Method in Theology and Third Collection. Lecture plus seminar. Requirements: weekly seminar preparation and participation, four one-page reflections, final paper, and take-home exam.

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 12:00
Instructors: Michael Vertin
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 15
ICT5220HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

God/Sex/Word/Flesh: Gender, Theology and the Body

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

How is our agenda for theology related to our gender? Is ‘God’ a male word? Is the ‘Word made flesh’ a male God? Does the experience of women change how God is (made) known? Is sexuality embraced by the resurrection? Attentive to the work of feminist theologians and biblical scholars, we will attempt to develop an ‘embodied’ theology open to the biblical vision that God will be ‘all in all’.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT5239HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/04/13

Holy Intimacy: Kenosis

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores Christian Kenosis as an expression of the unconditional love of God made known in Christ. Here, the mutual relations of self-giving in the Trinity may be mirrored in the lives of human beings. Divine humility, vulnerability and compassion are seen as the source of life-giving grace and dynamic relationships of trust and fidelity. In dialogue: Hans urs von Balthasar, Sarah Coakley, James Alison, Bernard Haring, Pope John Paul II, and Thomas Merton. Lectures, discussion, class presentations, research paper.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 12 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
SMT5330HF  L0101

Openness & Gift: Rahner

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the theology of Karl Rahner. Attention to his place within Roman Catholic thought of his time. Special emphasis on his philosophical presuppositions and his understanding of revelation, human nature, grace, Christ, the Church, dogma, and ecumenical dialogue. Lectures, discussions, class presentations, short paper, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
WYT5410HS  L0101

The Church Evangelical and Catholic

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores a range of proposals in contemporary ecclesiology across the eccumenical spectrum. Special attention will be given to questions surrounding the Church's concretely historical character, as in the ecclesiology of "practices" and its critics. Authors read may include Ratzinger, Jenson, Hauerwas, Cavanaugh, Radner and Healy. Seminar discussion; brief, bullet-point responses to the readings; 2500-word final paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT5510HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/17

Nineteenth-Century Protestant Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An overview of major developments in Protestant theology in the 19th century, emphasizing issues in Christology and soteriology, eschatology and theology of history, theology and social justice, and theology and science, and focusing on the work of theologians such as Horace Bushnell, F. D. Maurice, Albrecht Ritschl, Adolf Harnack, and Ernst Troeltsch. Lectures, discussion, student presentations and papers.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 10 · Crosslisted to: Historical
TRT5530HF  L0101

Readings in Augustine

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examination of Augustine's writings against the Manichaeans, the Donatists, and the Pelagians. Discussion of weekly readings and a major paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands, Peter Slater
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
WYT5576HS  L0101

Karl Barth on the Doctrine of Incarnation and the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar course will examine the following topics in Barth’s Church Dogmatics I/2 : Jesus Christ as the objective revelation of God, God’s time and human time, Jesus Christ as true God and true human, the virgin birth, the Holy Spirit as the subjective revelation of God, the abolition of religion, the life of the children of God. Weekly readings; class presentation; oral examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT5578HS  L0101

Lonergan's Method in Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course introduces five aspects of advanced theological research through a critical reading of Bernard Lonergan's Method in Theology. Lonergan's methodological approach is exemplified and complemented by rhetorical analysis, genetic analysis, source reading, clarification by contrast and systematic reasoning. Readings, bulletin board participation, critical book review, seminar, major paper.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gordon Rixon
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12
TRT5579HS  L0101

Kierkegaard's Studies

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Central ideas in the Kierkegaard corpus and their relevance to contemporary theological and philosophical concerns. Introductory lecture, seminar discussion of readings, discussions, one major term paper.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
SMT5603HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/09/03

New Voices in Theology II: Advanced Studies

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course provides an opportunity to address in greater focus and depth issues of the "new" and "newer" voices in theology: liberation and contextual theologies in the global South (including US Black and womanist theologies, Hispanic theologies, Canadian-Asian and US-Asian theologies), feminist theologies, eco-theologies, indigenous spiritualities, LGBTQ theologies, and social ethics. First third of course will focus on reviews of: the emergence and development of these "new" theologies; key methodological issues (epistemological/ hermeneutical privilege(s) of the oppressed; postcolonialism, decolonialism); resurgence of social movements and emergent global civil society; recent dialogues and new initiatives (religious diversity, inter-culturality). Remaining classes provide opportunities for students (individually or in teams) to present their own in-depth research on specific topics. Class participation; seminar; research paper

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Lee F. Cormie
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT5605HF  L0101

Theological Method and Hermeneutics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examination of resources and methods in theological work, focusing on hermeneutics as a strategic way of thinking about the role of texts and traditions in theological reflection. Emphasis on interpretation theories in conjunction with liberal, postliberal, and postmodern theological methodologies, particularly regarding issues of faith, authority, revelation, and religious pluralism. Lectures, discussions, student presentations, research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
TRT5625HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/05

Enemies of God: Religion and Violence in a (Post) Modern Time

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The relationship of religion and violence infuses most of the world’s known religions on the levels of history, practice and belief. This course will explore the internal dynamics of religious violence and religious terror/terrorism from comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives. A major course theme will focus on the internal dialectic in religion that strives to strengthen a sense of identity and agency within the believing community while evacuating individual difference either through internal suppression or projective dissociation. The course will also consider the conflict between religion and (post)modernity that fuels some expressions of contemporary religious violence, and will consider ways in which religion may contribute more effectively toward peaceful, democratic and egalitarian relationships and ways of life.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT5715HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Theories of Globalization: Capitalism, Culture, and Democracy

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Two concepts mark sites of contention in contemporary social theory: “globalization” and “democracy.” Whereas the first points to an incessant flow of capital and information technologies across national and cultural borders, the second suggests modes of participation that resist state or market imperatives. This seminar works toward a normative theory and critique of the current world order. 

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT5721HF  L0101

The Meaning of Religious Faith

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of concepts of faith in both religious and non-religious contexts. Critical attention will be focused on Kierkegaard, Wilfrid Cantwell Smith, and Sartre and Camus. Seminar preparation and a major paper.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
RGT5728HF  L0101

Philosophy and Theology of Beauty

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores philosophical method for a theology of beauty. It takes Balthasar's assessment of the loss of beauty as a philosophical and theological reality as a context to survey the implications and the conditions for its recovery. Issues such as the nature of beauty, aesthetic experience/perception, judgments, the beauty of God/Christ, and other cultural notions of beauty will be considered. It will also investigate Lonergan's philosophy as a basis for theological aesthetics.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT5763HF  L0101

Metaphysics after Auschwitz: Adorno's Negative Dialectics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

No serious philosopher after Kant has been able to avoid his critique of metaphysical speculations about God, the soul, and the meaning of existence. The horrors of recent history give added urgency to such questions. Theodor W. Adorno has posed these issues in dramatic and decisive ways. This seminar studies his reflections in Negative Dialectics on the status of metaphysics "after Auschwitz."

Schedule: Monday, 12:00 to 15:00
Instructors: Lambert Zuidervaart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Permission of the instructor
TRT5813HF  L0101

Origins, Evolution and Psychology of Religious Experience

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore the nature of religious experience from the perspectives of psychology, recent evolutionary theory and theories of the emergence of the modern mind. We will explore the ways in which ancient peoples forged a 'consciousness contract' that allowed those individuals and groups whose facility for entering altered states of consciousness that gave them access to the world of spirits and god(s) also gave them enormous political and social power and authority. Drawing on research in neuropsychology and contemporary evolutionary psychology, the course will consider that religious experience is not a mere result of the pressures of the material environment but rather an interaction between neurobiological capacities and their interaction with culture. Moreover, it will be considered that the human capacity for religious experience, symbol formation, the manipulation of images and altered states of consciousness that shape religious beliefs and rituals have significant impact on human action in shaping the environment and forming culture. Writers studied will include, but not be limited to, the theories of religion and the mind as elaborated by Ludwig Feuerbach, Sigmund Freud, William James, David Lewis-Williams, Brian Hayden and Walter Burkert. We will also examine specific cases of the religious experiences of medieval Christian mystics.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
TRT5867HS  L0101

Religious Pluralism as Theological Challenge

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Challenges of religious pluralism to Christianity appearing from outside Christianity, and responses to it. How do other world religious traditions think about Christianity or religions for that matter? What are the theoretical problems of religious pluralism and the response to them from within Christianity? Discussions of selected readings and occasional lectures as appropriate.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
EMT5931HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/02

Postcolonial Theories, Intercultural Theologies and Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Intercultural refers to mutually reciprocal relationships among and between cultures. This course explores postcolonial theories, theologies and ethics as critical resources for intercultural practices. We will investigate how culture is variously understood and emphasize questions of the politics of location; the power of difference; an ethics of ambiguity and perseverance; identity and knowledge formation in global, local and transnational contexts; living with complex difference, dislocation and connection; the negotiation of shared meanings through discourses of class, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexuality, and place; and, to keep our feet on the ground, what is at stake in Canadian discourses of multicultural and postcolonial discourses for becoming intercultural communities. In-class practice will include honing collegial skills of intellectual life based on comprehension of and critical engagement with texts and learning to be self-reflexive and to communicate one’s own stance in relation to others. Lectures, discussions, book review, presentation, and final research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
TRT5948HS  L0101

Critical Theory & Feminist Religious Thought

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inquiry into the role and meaning of religion in a post/metaphysical, post/secular time within the frameworks of critical theory, psychoanalysis and ethics. Authors include Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Freud, Habermas and their theological/religious interlocutors, i.e. Charles Davis, Elisabeth Schuessler Fiorenza, Hent de Vries. Major paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
RGT5975HF  L0101

Thomistic Moral Theologies

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Focusing on recent interpretations of the moral theology of St. Thomas, the course will examine competing understandings of Aquinas’ ethics, both for understanding Aquinas’ account of morality in its historical context, and for drawing resources in order to address key issues in contemporary moral theology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
6000 Level Courses
TRT6227HF  L0101

Trinity & Scripture: Theological and Exegetical Renewal of the Christian Doctrine of God

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines the recovery and renewal of Trinitarian doctrine and theology since the turn of the twentieth century with a broad focus upon Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox theologians; the reexamination of the doctrine’s sources in Scripture through theological exegesis and current trends in its formulations. The course will proceed along a lecture / discussion format, with readings from relevant literature. Assignments will include short reflection papers and a research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRT3227HF.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Kurt Anders Richardson
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 340
RGT6243HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course invites the student to study the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's Christological reflection. Students are helped to develop a systematic understanding of the person and work of Jesus Christ, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the Christian tradition for pastoral leadership. Reading assignments, short papers, oral exam. Seminar work may require an additional one-hour commitment per week.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3243HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNT6271HS  L0101

Doctrines of Reconciliation

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Critical assessment of the most important and formative theories with particular reference to those that have shaped reformed perspectives. Lectures and group discussion. Evaluation by essay. Prerequisites: A basic introductory theology course plus another theology course. Knox students should have completed Church, Ministry, Sacraments.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNT3271HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6320HF  L0101

Doing Justice with Spirit

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological perspectives and spiritual practices for integrating faith and the work for justice, peace and a healthy environment. Evaluation by essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3320HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: John E. Costello
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes: Max 25 (AD & BD)
EMT6344HS  L0101

Creation and Eschatology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Will the universe be destroyed and discarded, or redeemed and transformed with God's consummation of all things? This course considers these and related questions by examining the biblical and philosophical foundations for Christian reflections on the beginning and end of the world; significant historical and contemporary theological contributions (e.g., early Christian apologists, Irenaeus, Augustine, Calvin, Barth, Moltmann, Pannenberg, Ruether, McFague); the significance of the resurrection of Jesus Christ; the influence of modern and postmodern scientific thought, ecological consciousness, and religious pluralism; and the role of apocalyptic thought in contemporary culture. Lectures, class discussion, required and recommended reading, mid-term and final paper, and optional class presentation.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3344HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Bourgeois
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6352HS  L0101

Theology of the Spiritual Exercise

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Karl Rahner maintained that the theology of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius had yet to be fully explored. This research seminar will attempt to make some contribution to the task. There will be a detailed analysis of the text to identify the theological issues contained therein. The work of Karl Rahner and Hans Urs von Balthasar will provide additional commentary. Contemporary biblical scholarship, certain reinterpretations and the theological anthropology of John Paul II will provide relevant dialogue partners. Participation is by permission of the professor, preference will be given to those who have made the Spiritual Exercises.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3352HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Previously taught at the 5000 level.
SMT6370HS  L0101

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practical integration.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3370HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
RGT6404HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/11/24

Communion Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A sampling of various modern approaches to communion ecclesiology in Western Christian and Eastern Orthodox theologians. History of communion ecclesiology and its relationship to ecumenism. Lectures, seminars, synthesis papers, research paper. Prerequisite: Two introductory courses in Theology.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3404HS.

Schedule: Friday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TXT6408HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/21

Sacramental Theology: Baptism, Eucharist, and other Signs of the Gospel

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A course which explores the theological rationale of sacraments, with special attention given to Anglican perspectives on the nature of sacraments in general, as well as their relation to the life and mission of the Church. Students will engage the sacraments of Baptism and Eucharist both as specific church practices and in their relation to one another. Students will be expected to read a range of representative authors and texts, both Anglican and non-Anglican. Lecture and seminar discussion. Four short discussion papers (or two extended essays). Final viva voce examination.

Basic Degree students enrol in TXT3408HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina, Stephen J. Reynolds
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT6501HF  L0101

History of Modern European Christian Thought -- 1600-1800

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3501HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT6552HF  L0101

Aquinas on the Spiritual Life

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on Aquinas' Summa Theologiae and its systematic theology of the Christian life: faith, hope and love are the foundational principles that ground the concrete living out of the imitatio Christi in a life of prayer, service, preaching and leadership in the Church. Importance of philosophical, rhetorical and historical tools for reading the text. Weekly reading, weekly papers, term paper, participation in class discussion.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3552HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
RGT6553HS  L0101

Aquinas on the Incarnation

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A text based seminar examining Aquinas' theology of the Incarnation in the Summa Theologiae. Students will develop critical reading skills and familiarity with the grammatical, rhetorical and dialectical dimensions of Aquinas' systematics. Basic Degree: Short papers, reading assignments, major paper. Advanced degree: three shorter papers, classroom presentation, reading assignments, major research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3553HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT6566HF  L0101

Studies in Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theology of grace in representative Anglican theologians, including Thomas Cranmer, Richard Hooker, the Caroline Divines, the Tractarians, F.D. Maurice, Lux Mundi and William Temple. Prerequisite: introductory course in theology.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRT3566HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity College, Room TC24
RGT6581HF  L0101

Hans Urs von Balthasar

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inspiring and profound are terms often attributed to the theology of von Balthasar. Benedict XVI said of his work, "His theological reflection maintains intact, to this day, a profound timeliness and leads many to penetrate ever more into the profoundity of the mystery of faith". This course begins an exploration of his work. There is consideration of the Trilogy: Herrlichkeit, Theo-Drama and Theo-Logic; the influence of Ignatius Loyola and Adrienne von Speyr; and the place of Mary. Not a course for the faint-hearted, von Balthasar's work is at times dense and complex but the rewards are beyond price. Prerequisite: one year of theology, at least three theology courses.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3581HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT6602HF  L0101

New Voices in Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In recent decades hosts of “new” voices have joined and vastly expanded theological dialogue: African Americans, women, and “Third World”–Latin American, South African, Filipino, Indian, Sri Lankan, Korean, etc.  More recently indigenous, Hispanic American, womanist, gay and lesbian, mujerista/Latina, Asian-American and Asian-Canadian, and ecological voices are expanding the dialogues.  And the number of new and newer voices continues to grow.  We will: trace the early history of dialogues among these new voices and sample more recent voices; identify points of convergence and divergence; examine hermeneutical and methodological issues concerning experience, standpoints, perspectives; probe the riches of diversity, the dangers of relativism and new grounds for authenticity and authority; explore new theological frontiers in (re)discovering/recentering theology in the Spirit and reconceiving history; survey the challenges and opportunities confronting theology and the church accompanying the eruptions of new voices in a rapidly changing world, and the struggles over the future. Readings, class participation, short papers, and (for AD students) research paper - adult learning process.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3602HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Lee F. Cormie
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT6608HF  L0101

New Directions in Magisterial Teaching

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Recent teaching of the Roman Catholic magisterium on war and peace, social teaching about justice, ecumenical dialogue, nonchristian religions, and women. This course provides an update on important new directions in Catholic magisterial teaching on these five topics. The course examines the varying authority of different magisterial documents and focuses on methods of interpretation. Auditors welcome. Lectures, discussions, paper, take-home exam.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3608HF.

Schedule: Monday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors:
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMT6617HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/31

Islam: History, Doctrine, and Practice

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course serves as an introduction to the highly relevant Islamic faith and culture. It will cover the historical evolution as its doctrine and life. Beginning with its emergence with the Prophet, his revelation and early community, its spread under the caliphs, the fixation of the Qu’ran, and its subsequent historical development: the Umayyad, Abbasid, Famitid, Mamluk, Ottoman, and contemporary periods. Alongside this historical aspect, a systematic reflection on the main principles of Islamic faith, its theology and piety, its life, observances and festivals, and not least, its interaction with other religions in the modern world, chiefly Christianity, will be engaged. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3617HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical, Pastoral Theology
WYT6651HF  L0101

The Theologies of Luther and Calvin

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course of lectures will examine Luther's writings on the theology of the cross and on human freedom; and Calvin's writings on Scripture and the Christian life. Weekly readings; a final examination (oral or written).

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3651HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SMT6670HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/04/16

Thought of Vatican II

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Studies the documents and teachings of Vatican II. Brief overview of the historical background to the Council and to Councils in the life of the church. Seminars guide discussions based on close readings of the 16 documents with emphasis on the historical context and ecclesiological significance of each document. Seminar presentations; participation in analysis of the documents; integration paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3670HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 25 · Crosslisted to: Historical
EMT6672HS  L0101

Theology, Violence, and Peace

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores theological reflection in relation to violence and peace, particularly in Christian traditions. Theories of violence and non-violence as well as case studies from the past and present will provide the means to investigate the ways faith-based claims justify or promote enmity and hostility and/or hospitality and peacemaking in Christian practice. Attention may be given to violence/peace in connection with theologies of revelation and atonement; justice/love; gender, race, ethnicity, class, and disability; Empire and globalization processes; interfaith relations with Jewish, Muslim, and Canadian Aboriginal communities; and the possibility of forgiveness and reconciliation. Lectures, discussions, journal exercises, book review, presentation, and final research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3672HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD 8; BD 16)
ICT6702HF  L0101

Religion, Life and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the "Amsterdam School" of neo-Calvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and other schools of thought.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3702HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
RGT6706HS  L0101

Ignatian Contribution to Contemporary Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course evaluates the Ignatian contribution to comtemporary ecclesiology. Utilizing key texts it situates Ignatius' sense of "Church" and the Society of Jesus relationship to the Church. Explores key issues and potential problems faced by a twenty-first-century reader of Ignatius. Engagement with contemporary Jesuit theologians, and the writings of Pope John Paul II and Cardinal Ratzinger. Mid-term paper, research paper, oral exam, class participation.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3706HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
ICT6716HF  L0101

Wittgenstein: Language & the Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Wittgenstein’s philosophy continues to generate enormous interest, and his name is frequently cited in connection with radical developments in theology and the philosophy of religion. Via an exploration of the different accounts of language and meaning he presents in both his early and later work, this course will focus on his thought as it relates to religious belief and commitment in particular.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3716HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6730HS  L0101

The Divine (At) Risk? Open Theism, Classical Theism and Beyond

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Did God take a risk in creating the world? How are divine and human freedom related? Can we confess God’s sovereignty in the face of evil? This course will explore the different ways in which the God of history is viewed by advocates and critics of “Open Theism.” Our examination will stimulate our own reflections on how we might best understand and, indeed, image God’s love, knowledge and power.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3730HS.

Schedule: Monday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6732HS  L0101

Imagining the World with Ricoeur

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will focus on two of Ricoeur’s essay collections, From Text to Action and Figuring the Sacred. Students will explore the general shape of Ricoeur’s heremeneutical phenomenology, including such themes as textual interpretation, action, explanation, understanding, ideology, and utopia. From there, the course will focus on Ricoeur’s thoughts concerning the disclosive force of religious texts in particular, including his understanding of the way Christian communities might best face the task of appropriating a textual heritage from which time has distanced them, and concerning which they may have lost a certain original naivety. Imagining the world with Ricoeur, we will discuss how his recommendations contribute to our effort to find meaning and inspiration amidst the crises and fragmentations that run through contemporary life. Course evaluation is weighted as follows: Class participation: 20%; Seminar Leadership: 30%; Paper: 50%.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3732HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6743HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

The Self and Its Others: Identity, Difference, and Responsibility

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the notion that subjectivity is not merely given but produced through an encounter with society, language and other selves. It explores the ethical and political consequences of this possibility. It examines the construction of ethnic, religious, racial, and gendered difference, the forces that have constituted them as ""other"" instead of the "same," and the consequences this has for the construction of the self and its obligations and responsibilities.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3743HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6775HF  L0101

Deconstruction and Politics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the uneasy relationship between deconstruction and politics. We will begin the course by familiarizing ourselves with Jacques Derrida's deconstuctive method, and continue by reading his work on issues of justice, law, cosmopolitanism, ethics, and the right to philosophy. The rest of the course will be spent engaging with various contemporaries of Derrida for whom his work in deconstruction and political philosophy has been important: Drucilla Cornell, Giorgio Agamben, Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3775HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
ICT6776HS  L0101

Feminist Social Thought

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore current contributions to the field of feminist social thought. We will read from figures such as Gloria Anzaldu, Seyla Benhabib, Judith Butler, Nancy Fraser, and Chandra Mohanty on various ways of understanding the relationships between gendered identities and sociopolitical states of affairs.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3776HS.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Shannon Hoff
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT6805HS  L0101

Postmodernity and a Christian Worldview

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Postmodernity as a cultural phenomenon, implications in various areas of cultural endeavour (including politics, philosophy, psychology, theology, the arts, and science), and work toward an integral Christian worldview that gives guidance in a post-modern world. A particular concern will be to plumb the resources of Scripture for such a cultural context.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3805HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6829HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Theologies of Art: Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Format: lectures, readings and discussions. Evaluation: class participation, presentation and a final paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3829HS.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6863HF  L0101

Christianity & World Religions

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the contemporary world, ecumenism must include dialogue between Christianity and world religions. This course will examine not only Christian attitudes to world religions, but also attitudes of world religions to other belief systems. Lectures, discussion, paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3863HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
SMT6866HS  L0101

New Heaven / New Earth

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A variant reading of the Genesis story of creation and fall speaks of the process of humans’ maturing, becoming like God, in their knowledge of good and evil and capacities to act, and the implications–for good and ill–of their choices for all of creation.  This reading seems especially challenging today in the midst of debates about the direction and control of scientific research, the development of promising and frightening new technologies, conflicts over “globalization,” and growing gaps between rich and poor.  These debates are filled with images of God-like powers of discovery and invention, fantastic new technologies, medical miracles, unlimited progress, and a new golden era of affluence and ease; some even point to the emergence of humanly-engineered successor species and a transhuman or posthuman future.  At the same time, these debates are haunted with images of widening gaps in incomes and wealth, growing suffering, deepening turmoil and chaos, apocalypse.  Through seminars on significant debates about  knowledge explosions, new technologies, multiple and uneven globalization(s), and alternative futures, and re-readings of biblical texts, we will probe the specifically theological/spiritual dimensions of these debates, with special reference to images of “playing God,” de-creation and re-creation or Genesis II, transcendence through technology, and hope that “another world is possible.” Readings, class participation, short papers, and (for AD students) research paper - adult learning process.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3866HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Lee F. Cormie
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT6878HS  L0101

Towards a Christian Political Economy: The Writings of Bob Goudzwaard

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Bob Goudzwaard has been a leading Christian political economist in the Netherlands for the last forty years. Professor Emeritus of the Free University of Amsterdam, former member of parliament, advisor to political parties, think tanks and NGO’s around the world, Goudzwaard has had a profound influence in shaping a Christian political-economic imagination. In this course we will read Goudzwaard’s most important books and articles (in translation) and have the opportunity to spend four seminars in conversation with him while he is in Toronto in January and February. Lectures, seminars, student seminars. Means of evaluation: Seminar participation, presentations and major essay.

Schedule: Monday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT6927HF  L0101

Ethics of Wealth and Poverty

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2007 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will begin with a summation of Biblical teaching about wealth and poverty, and the succeeding sessions will study diverse interpretations of that teaching in the history of Christian thought. Attention will be paid to the historical context of the theology under study, including contemporary ethical teaching and economic practice. The goals of the course will be to appreciate the paradoxical character of Biblical teaching on wealth and poverty, as well as the diverse ways in which theologies on wealth and poverty have reflected the impact of socio-economic change. The value of the study will be its assisting students to cope with 21st century challenges in its uneven regional and social distribution of wealth and poverty.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3927HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Reginald Stackhouse
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
EMT6934HS  L0101

Good Sex: Sexuality in Ethical Perspective

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

To deepen awareness of personal, social, cultural, and religious dimensions of sexuality, especially as these affect selfhood and community, this course explores the meaning and requirements of sexual justice for churches and civil society. Students will aim to frame a constructive Christian sexual ethic. Seminar presentations, book review and major paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3934HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT6955HS  L0101

Approaches to Ecological Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will consider issues and documents that will help the student to develop an understanding of the ecological crisis as well as ethical and theological responses to it. Topics will include: the new cosmology; ecofeminism; the limitations of a human-centred ethics; issues of economic, social, and gender justice; and environmental-human health issues. Short papers; integration paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3955HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6991HS  L0101

Questions in Sexual Ethics

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Readings in contemporary concerns in Roman Catholic sexual ethics and their systematic development. Permission of professor is required.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3991HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Biblical Crosslisted Courses
ICB2010HF  L0101

Biblical Foundations

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore the Bible as the ongoing story of and for God and creation, with special attention to how God's story is intertwined with that of humanity and the world. In asking whether and in what way the Bible is also our story, we will attempt to identify which hermeneutical methods might help us discern its significance for present day life, including the academic enterprise.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
KNB5931HS  L0101

Biblical Textuality, Knowledge, Power and Meaning

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of biblical textuality, its reconstruction in the form of western knowledge/power, and its role in the formation of existential meaning, through a guided reading of phenomenology, poststructuralism, feminist criticism, and postcolonial criticism. Seminar. 4 exploration papers, class participation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Bradley McLean
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Historical Crosslisted Courses
TRH2061HS  L0101

The Birth of Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to Patristic thought to 451 AD, surveying principal writers East and West. Detailed study of Athanasius On the Incarnation and The Tome of Leo. Lectures, readings, four short reports and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 213
TRH2061HS  L6101

The Birth of Theology

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Online Course

An introduction to Patristic thought to 451 AD, surveying principal writers East and West. Detailed study of Athanasius On the Incarnation and The Tome of Leo. Lectures, readings, four short reports and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
SMH3021HF  L0101

Holy City, Holy Places, Holy Things

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Although from the very beginning, Christianity appeared especially connected to the particular geography, it will only be with the Fourth century, that the “Holy Places” arose as such, becoming essential part of an emerging culture of pilgrimage. Jerusalem and the Holy Land gradually evolve into the epicenter of the Christian world. Liturgical practices of the Holy City and the Holy Land will develop into standard and normative as pilgrims from throughout the world return to their countries and establish there the usages of the “Holy Places”. This course explores the interaction of pilgrimage, liturgical, and spiritual life in Holy Land and their impact in the development of Early Christianity. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

AD students enrol in SMH6021HF.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate, Dan Bahat
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Pastoral Theology
TRH3236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

AD students enrol in TRH6236HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
ICH3313HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Thomist Histories of Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2004 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examines the Thomistic histories of philosophy of Gilson and MacIntyre, in terms of Aristotle's account of the history of "first philosophy" as it came to be commented by Thomas Aquinas. It examines the philosophical work to be done by studying philosophy's history in terms of what philosophers think is truly first about and within things.

AD students enrol in ICH6313HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH3351HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Faithful Thinking and World Orientation: Augustine, Aquinas, Dooyeweerd, Olthuis

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines four temporally and culturally distinct examples of Christian thinking about God, self and world. It takes up one ancient, one medieval, one modern and one "postmodern" thinker and compares how they frame their thinking with respect to their scholarly world and the pre- and post-Christian elements characteristic of it. It compares their respective attempts to speak of the problematics signaled by the terms God, self and world: a. knowledge as religious, b. self as simultaneously divine image and part of a world of creatures, c. the social world as the field within which God, self and world intersect.

AD students enrol in ICH6351HS.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH3430HF  L0101

Roots of the Orthodox Tradition

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the life and works of major patristic authors who shaped and influenced the Eastern Christian tradition, including Ignatius, Irenaeus, Origen, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, the Cappadocians, Maximus the Confessor, Simeon the New Theologian, Nicholas Cabasilas, Gregory Palamas. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper.

AD students enrol in RGH6430HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Previously taught at the 2000 level.
CGH3753HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/25

Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Life & Thought

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer in the context of his life: studies, teaching, World Council of Churches, Confessing Church, resistance to Hitler. Essay, take-home exam. Taught in Toronto.

AD students enrol in CGH6753HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: A. James Reimer
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH3755HS  L0101

Theology & Spirituality of Icons

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

AD students enrol in RGH6755HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH3757HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Beauty: Theology, Ethics or Aesthetics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Is beauty simply "in the eye of the beholder," or is it something more? Is it a way to God, a moral precept, or the specific locus for a unique kind of pleasure? This course examines a variety of subjective and objective views of beauty in the history of Western philosophy and theology from antiquity to the present (e.g. in the thought of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Weil, Barth, and Balthasar). It will also consider the implications of these views of beauty for the production of the visual arts, music, and literary culture in Western religion and society.

AD students enrol in ICH6757HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
SMH5012HF  L0101

Ephrem & Syriac Christianity

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Alongside with Greek and Latin, Syriac Christianity was a crucial factor in the development of Christian theology, worship, and spirituality in the first centuries. A unique witness to the original Semitic character of the Church, Syriac Christianity provides deep insights into the symbolic and poetic approach to the mystery of God. This attains its summit in the theology and spirituality of Ephrem the Syrian. In the present course, reading and discussion of his works will be undertaken against the background of the development of Syriac Christianity from the 2nd up to the 8th century. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH5017HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Spiritual Exercise as Christian Philosophy from Augustine to Bonaventure

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2005 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will examine philosophical texts that give a central place to spiritual exercises. The tradition of such exercises will be traced back to its roots in Hellenism and medieval Augustinianism via texts of Augustine, Anselm and Bonaventure. Thereby, participants take up anew ancient questions surrounding the forms of discourse appropriate to philosophy.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH5049HF  L0101

Mani and the Kingdom of Light--Exploring an Alternate Christianity

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mani, an inhabitant of 3rd century Iraq/Iran believed himself to be the Paraclete promised by Jesus. From that belief grew a church which reached from North Africa to China and lasted over a thousand years, including among its sympathizers the young St. Augustine. This course will use the writings of Manichaeans and their opponents, including Augustine, to address the criteria of Christian identity, and use a theological system not based on the incarnation to explore the meaning of creation, revelation, and redemption in more conventional contexts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Richard Paul Vaggione
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larking Building, Room 213
SMH5701HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/31

Athanasius of Alexandria

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the dramatic half century that followed the council of Nicaea in the fourth century, Athanasius rallied the theologians that sought a creative adhesion to the Nicene Creed. In doing this, he delved into the mystery of the Incarnation of the Lord and later on of the divinity of the Holy Spirit. In addition to this, he was instrumental in canalizing the momentum of monastic emergence into the Church, mainly through his “Life of Anthony.” The course will engage in a detailed and contextualized reading of his main works and their relevance for the theological enterprise. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH5751HF  L0101

The Aesthetics of Compassion

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In light of recent renewed interest in the meanings and mechanisms of empathy in such areas as ethics, visual studies, and the philosophy of the mind, this course examines the place and role of compassion in the development of the Western aesthetics tradition. Considering a range of art theoretical texts, literature, and images for which the theme of compassion has been thought able to account for certain of the emotional and cognitive links that exist between artwork and its audience.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
SMH6021HF  L0101

Holy City, Holy Places, Holy Things

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Although from the very beginning, Christianity appeared especially connected to the particular geography, it will only be with the Fourth century, that the “Holy Places” arose as such, becoming essential part of an emerging culture of pilgrimage. Jerusalem and the Holy Land gradually evolve into the epicenter of the Christian world. Liturgical practices of the Holy City and the Holy Land will develop into standard and normative as pilgrims from throughout the world return to their countries and establish there the usages of the “Holy Places”. This course explores the interaction of pilgrimage, liturgical, and spiritual life in Holy Land and their impact in the development of Early Christianity. Discussions, presentations. One essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMH3021HF.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Pablo Argárate, Dan Bahat
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Pastoral Theology
TRH6236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3236HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 212
ICH6313HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Thomist Histories of Philosophy

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Examines the Thomistic histories of philosophy of Gilson and MacIntyre, in terms of Aristotle's account of the history of "first philosophy" as it came to be commented by Thomas Aquinas. It examines the philosophical work to be done by studying philosophy's history in terms of what philosophers think is truly first about and within things.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3313HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH6351HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Faithful Thinking and World Orientation: Augustine, Aquinas, Dooyeweerd, Olthuis

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course examines four temporally and culturally distinct examples of Christian thinking about God, self and world. It takes up one ancient, one medieval, one modern and one "postmodern" thinker and compares how they frame their thinking with respect to their scholarly world and the pre- and post-Christian elements characteristic of it. It compares their respective attempts to speak of the problematics signaled by the terms God, self and world: a. knowledge as religious, b. self as simultaneously divine image and part of a world of creatures, c. the social world as the field within which God, self and world intersect.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3351HS.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH6430HF  L0101

Roots of the Orthodox Tradition

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the life and works of major patristic authors who shaped and influenced the Eastern Christian tradition, including Ignatius, Irenaeus, Origen, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, the Cappadocians, Maximus the Confessor, Simeon the New Theologian, Nicholas Cabasilas, Gregory Palamas. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGH3430HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Previously taught at the 2000 level.
CGH6753HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/03/25

Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Life & Thought

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Theological writings of Dietrich Bonhoeffer in the context of his life: studies, teaching, World Council of Churches, Confessing Church, resistance to Hitler. Essay, take-home exam. Taught in Toronto.

Basic Degree students enrol in CGH3753HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: A. James Reimer
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGH6755HS  L0101

Theology & Spirituality of Icons

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah.

Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGH3755HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH6757HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/06/12

Beauty: Theology, Ethics or Aesthetics

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Is beauty simply "in the eye of the beholder," or is it something more? Is it a way to God, a moral precept, or the specific locus for a unique kind of pleasure? This course examines a variety of subjective and objective views of beauty in the history of Western philosophy and theology from antiquity to the present (e.g. in the thought of Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Weil, Barth, and Balthasar). It will also consider the implications of these views of beauty for the production of the visual arts, music, and literary culture in Western religion and society.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3757HF.

Schedule: TBA · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Interdisciplinary Crosslisted Courses
SAJ1501HY  L0101

Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Beginning with a quick review of English grammar, the course will introduce the grammar and syntax of the Latin language and provide practice in their use in order to lead students to a reading knowledge of Ecclesiastical Latin: the Vulgate, Canon Law, Ambrose, Augustine, Jerome, Aquinas, hymns and other documents. Evaluation will be based on course assignments, weekly class participation, periodic tests and a final exam. Please note: the second hour of each class is a mandatory tutorial.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Mechtilde O'Mara
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Full Year · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Historical
TRJ2631HF  L6101

Anglican History And Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Online Course

Introductory study of the Anglican communion as a worldwide form of Christianity; its history, key theological issues, worship, schools of thought, approaches to spirituality. 3 short papers. Interdisciplinary History and Theology.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Historical
TRJ2631HF  L0101

Anglican History And Theology

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introductory study of the Anglican communion as a worldwide form of Christianity; its history, key theological issues, worship, schools of thought, approaches to spirituality. 3 short papers. Interdisciplinary History and Theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, Room 341
SMJ3801HS  L0101

Using the Bible

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Bible has been used to support all kinds of perspectives with varying degrees of responsibility. This course looks at the  use of the Bible in theological arguments. It will examine how the  Bible is APPLIED in conciliar and other church documents, as well as in  statements by ecumenical groups, sermons, and film. Some attention will be given to the variety of interpretive  methods in the history of the Church, but the main focus is the use (and abuse) of the Bible in contemporary theological argumentation. Topics include, e.g., Eucharistic debates, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, the role of women in the Church, and responses to war. Drawing on the rich variety of contemporary hermeneutical options, the  course aims to enrich students' exegetical skills and critical ability when making theological arguments and using church documents. The course is team-taught by a Lutheran professor of New Testament and a Catholic professor of theology. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final take-home exam.

AD students enrol in SMJ6801HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: , Colleen Shantz
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Biblical, Theological
SMJ6801HS  L0101

Using the Bible

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Bible has been used to support all kinds of perspectives with varying degrees of responsibility. This course looks at the  use of the Bible in theological arguments. It will examine how the  Bible is APPLIED in conciliar and other church documents, as well as in  statements by ecumenical groups, sermons, and film. Some attention will be given to the variety of interpretive  methods in the history of the Church, but the main focus is the use (and abuse) of the Bible in contemporary theological argumentation. Topics include, e.g., Eucharistic debates, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, the role of women in the Church, and responses to war. Drawing on the rich variety of contemporary hermeneutical options, the  course aims to enrich students' exegetical skills and critical ability when making theological arguments and using church documents. The course is team-taught by a Lutheran professor of New Testament and a Catholic professor of theology. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final take-home exam.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMJ3801HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: , Colleen Shantz
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Biblical, Theological
Pastoral Theology Crosslisted Courses
RGP3207HS  L0101

Spirituality and Suffering

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of religious responses to suffering. Focal issues will include the relation of love and spiritual transformation to suffering, the role of religious models or exemplars of suffering, and religious experience and the problems of theodicy. Readings will include works by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Dorothee Soelle and Simone Weil, as well as other selections drawn from the Christian, Buddhist, and Jewish traditions. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGP6207HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP3212YS  L0101

Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Intensive analysis of structure, content and spirituality of the Ignatian Exercises as a background for general ministry of spiritual growth and ministry in the church. Lecture and discussion. Class participation and short papers. Intended primarily for those who seek to direct the Exercises. Permission of the instructor required.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 18:30
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · Two Credits · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP3270HS  L0101

Discerning the Signs of the Times

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Exposes students to contemporary forms of critical and cultural analysis, using the analysis to look at spirituality and exposing students to contemporary manifestations of spirituality in a post-modern age. Eight reflection papers; class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP3280HF  L0101

Themes in Hindu Spirituality

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of religious experience in various Hindu traditions, within the context of an overview of relevant beliefs and practices. Lecture, discussion, exam and critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGP6280HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP3281HS  L0101

Religious Experience in the World's Religions

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the nature of religious experience in some of the major religions of the world, with special attention to Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It includes some comparative analysis between traditions, and creative reflection on the theological and pastoral significance of such comparative study. Lecture, discussion, four short reflection papers, one major essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
SMP3402HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2009/05/27

Theology of Ministry as Leadership

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2005 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores biblical foundations, selected historical issues, current theological understandings of ministry as leadership in church and society. Considers such themes as discipleship, vocation, lay ecclesial identity, collaboration and responsibility in ministry. Lectures, discussion, seminar, presentation, essay.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Mary Ellen Sheehan
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP5209HF  L0101

Spiritual Theology of Evelyn Underhill

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2005 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of the mystical, liturgical and pastoral theology of Evelyn Underhill, as she develops these in her novels and scholarly writings. Her thought will be examined in light of contemporary issues in spirituality, such as the status of the body, mysticism and social action, the subjectivization of mystical experiences, and the effect of socio-political structures on spirituality. Lectures, discussion, presentation, critical reflection paper.

Schedule: Monday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP6207HS  L0101

Spirituality and Suffering

Offered in Winter 2010  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of religious responses to suffering. Focal issues will include the relation of love and spiritual transformation to suffering, the role of religious models or exemplars of suffering, and religious experience and the problems of theodicy. Readings will include works by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Dorothee Soelle and Simone Weil, as well as other selections drawn from the Christian, Buddhist, and Jewish traditions. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3207HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
RGP6280HF  L0101

Themes in Hindu Spirituality

Offered in Fall 2009  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2006 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An exploration of religious experience in various Hindu traditions, within the context of an overview of relevant beliefs and practices. Lecture, discussion, exam and critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3280HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological

47 Queen's Park Crescent East · Toronto, Ontario · M5S 2C3 · Canada · Tel: 416-978-4039 · Fax: 416-978-7821 · E-mail: inquiries @ tst.edu
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Theological Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of <em>2009-2010</em>

Theological Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of <em>2009-2010</em>