Historical Courses for the Fall and Winter Sessions of 2013-2014

Course Listings by Level

Crosslisted Courses

1000 Level Courses
SAH1001HF  L0101

Early Christianity (to AD 600)

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course offers an opportunity to explore the history of the Christian Church from its origins in Judaism through to its monastic expansion beyond the boundaries of the Western Roman Empire in the sixth and seventh centuries. It will examine the conflicts, individuals, social movements and theologies that shaped Christianity during this formative period. Two Document Analyses, Seminar Presentation, Final Examination.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Peter M. Meehan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
EMH1010HF  L0101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This introductory course explores Christianity's formation and transformation from the post-apostolic era to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West in the year 843. Along the way, we will explore how Christians described their religious experience, practiced their faith, articulated and argued about their beliefs, and structured their ecclesial communities. We will learn about Christianity's changing relationship to political power; its engagement with other religions and cultures; the lifestyles, theological mindsets, and models of community proposed and debated by Christian leaders; the political and theological challenges associated with the movement's early marginalization, eventual expansion, encounter with Islam in the East and the "barbarians" in the West; and the formation of "Christian Europe."'Lecture, group discussions. Evaluation: practice quizzes, mid-term writing projects, choice of final exam or research paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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WYH1010HS  L0101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Class participation, course portfolio, one short essay, and two other academic exercises (choice of reading notes, short papers, weekly quizzes, final exam, etc.).

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Alan L. Hayes
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMH1010HS  L0101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Lectures, class discussion of readings, 1 research essay, 1 reflection paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNH1015HF  L0101

A Global History of Christianity - a survey

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of the history of Christianity and an introduction to the study of Christian history. Lecture. Book review, seminar participation, mid-term exam, final exam. Mandatory seminar.  No seminar the first week of class.  Seminar from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.  Class from 7:10 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Classes held at Wycliffe College

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:00 to 21:00
Schedule Notes: Classes at Wycliffe College
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
SAH2002HS  L0101

Medieval Christianity (600-1500)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of Church and society in the Middle Ages; its development of thought and piety. Lectures, discussions, minor paper, major paper, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
TRH2002HF  L0101

A History of the Church in the Middle Ages

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course aims to provide a general knowledge of mediaeval church history (600 - 1500) presented in a text and by exercising critical reasoning through analysing 3 primary texts chosen by the student. The reality of the church's life shown by the clergy, laity and in its worship is made tangible through manuscript, artistic and architectural material from videos and Power Point presentations. Teaching methods: seminars, audiovisuals, lectures.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRH2010HF  L0101

History of Christianity II

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The history of the Christian Church (mainly in the West) from the birth of a spiritually united medieval Europe under Charlemagne to its fragmentation in the Reformation and the Thirty Years' War.  Pagans and missionaries.  Popes and patriarchs. Princes and councils.  Reformers and radicals.  Monks and friars. Theology and heresy.  Daily Christian life and worship.  The course will consist of lectures and group discussions of selected primary sources.  GRADING PROCEDURES:  short weekly reading quizzes (matching, multiple choice, etc.), portfolio of short article summaries, class participation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
EMH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. The course will consist of lectures, small group discussions, and oral reports that summarize small group discussions. Mid-term assignments; choice of final exam or research papers. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Perquisite: History of Christianity I or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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KNH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity, may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Prerequisite: 1000 level history course. Primary source, assignment, paper, take home final.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2061HF  L0101

The Birth of Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to Patristic thought to 451 AD, surveying principal writers East and West. Detailed study of Athanasius On the Incarnation and The Tome of Leo. Lectures, readings, four short reports and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRH2061HF  L6101

The Birth of Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

An introduction to Patristic thought to 451 AD, surveying principal writers East and West. Detailed study of Athanasius On the Incarnation and The Tome of Leo. Lectures, readings, four short reports and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRH2105HS  L0101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRH2105HS  L6101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Online Course

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2210HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2013/11/05

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

This introductory course examines the history of Christianity from the Peace of Westphalia (1648) to the end of the twentieth century. As will be demonstrated throughout the course, the major catalyst for change has been, and continues to be, the constant tension between the inherently static nature of the historic Church and the forces of modernity. Throughout the course we will see how modern culture, which includes but is not limited to, contemporary politics, philosophy, literature, and painting, exercised an overwhelming influence on the development of eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century, and twentieth-century Christianity. Two short research summaries submitted online (40%), participation (20%), final exam submitted online (40%)

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
EMH2210HF  L0101

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine how Christianity has both contributed to the emergence of the modern world and has responded to some of the major developments that characterize modernity. Topics may include the impact of new ways of thinking on Christian world views; movements of religious renewal; Christian responses to new social trends and development; the geographic expansion of Christianity; developments in Christian practice and worship; Christianity and public life; new trends in Christian thought. Students who have taken --H2004H Modern Christianity (1750 to the present) may not take this course. Prerequisites: History of Christianity I or History of Christianity II, or with the permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:30 to 19:30
Instructors: Brian Clarke
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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SMH2229HF  L0101

History of Modern Catholicism (1648 - present)

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is an introductory survey of the institutional and social history of Modern Catholicism from 1648 to the present. It explores the reciprocal relationship between history and the development of Catholicism in faith and practice. Much attention will be given to significant events and important personalities that shaped global Catholicism throughout the period. Special attention will be given to the lived experience of Catholicism globally and in the particular context of Canada. Lectures; Discussions; Primary Source Analysis; Research Paper and Final Examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Daniel MacLeod
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
CGH2230HS  L4101

The Radical Reformation

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Waterloo Site

A study of Anabaptism and its place in the history of the Christian Church and the Reformation period.

Schedule: Monday, 13:00 to 15:50
Instructors: Troy D. Osborne
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAH2251HS  L0101

The Reformation Era

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will include a comprehensive overview of the Reformation Era, including: the critical movements of Catholic Reform during the late Middle Ages; the central Reform movements encouraged by figures such as Erasmus, Luther, Zwingli and Calvin; the special circumstances of the English Reformation and the spiritual renewal of the Counter-Reformation. Participation, Mid-term exam (Document Analysis), Research Paper, Final Examination.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
TRH2253HF  L6101

Modern Atheism

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Online Course

This introductory course surveys the history of atheism and secularization from the mid-eighteenth-century Western European Enlightenment to the present. We will not only read selections from some of the most important English, Scottish, German, and American atheists, agnostics, and rationalists of the period, but also examine and discuss how contemporary political and social thought contributed to the rise of secular thought and gradual decline in theological orthodoxy. The course will demonstrate how the writings of atheists and theological rationalists have always been predicated on significant intellectual and emotional tensions between orthodox Christianity and contemporary culture. Participation, research summary, book report, online final exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
WYH2311HS  L6101

History of Missions and Development

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Outlines the history of Christian missions from its beginnings in Pentecost to the end of the 20th century, followed by area studies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Europe, and concluding with a consideration of the transition from missions to development to post-development. Short papers and collaborative internet project.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Theological
TRH2421HF  L0101

The Emerging Christian Church: Church History to 451

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The first 450 years of Christianity reveal an essential central notion that faith requires ecclesiology and church membership for salvation; but the concrete history of the world-wide church reveals a rough-and-tumble dynamic of competing choices about the truth that constitute "church"; can an "Orthodox norm" of tradition and apostolicity be recognized in such a situation? Study of social, institutional, theological, spiritual, pastoral, "Gospel-and-local-culture", political, aspects of church life from primary sources. Not open to students who take - History of Christianity I (to AD 843).

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: David F. Wagschal
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
SAH2424HF  L0101

Modern History of the Catholic Church

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is an overview of the modern era of ecclesiastical history.  Beginning with the “Enlightenment”, we will examine the relationship between the Catholic Church and the world until Vatican II.  In the way we will look at the age of revolution, what new ideas like liberalism meant and how popes of the nineteenth century sought to deal with them.  The worldwide missionary experience of the Catholic Church at the time, as well as the rich history of Canadian Catholicism will be discussed.  Pius IX, Vatican I and the pontificate of Leo XIII will be a key part of the course, as well an examination of the issues that the Church had to confront in the twentieth century, such as world wars and the holocaust.  Light will be shed on these topics trough assigned readings, biographical studies and the study of examples of art and architecture from the period.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAH2447HS  L0101

History of Canadian Catholics

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Exploration of Amerindian and French interface, baroque spirituality, arrival of the Irish and Scots, ultramontane spirituality, Confederation and Catholic education, messianic language groups, Canadians cope with the Depression, church unity and the CCCB, the Asbestos Strike, Quiet Revolution, Vatican II, women, and Aboriginal People. Presentation, paper, and open exam.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
TRH2454HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/12/17

Liturgy 2: Baptism, Marriage, Healing, Death

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Byzantine liturgical texts for the totality of life birth and baptism, marriage, ordination, penance, death. Introduction of the variety of "Oriental" liturgies and comparison with "Byzantine". Advanced liturgical theology. Short essay, class discussion, longer essay. Recommended preparation: TRH2453H

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Pishoy Salama
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
TSH2454HS  L0101

Liturgy 2: Baptism, Marriage, Healing, Death

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Byzantine liturgical texts for the totality of life birth and baptism, marriage, ordination, penance, death. Introduction of the variety of "Oriental" liturgies and comparison with "Byzantine". Advanced liturgical theology. Short essay, class discussion, longer essay. Recommended preparation: TRH2453H

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Pishoy Salama
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2459HS  L0101

Old Testament: the Orthodox/Eastern Christian Understanding

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Evaluation of the possibility of interaction or dialogue between Orthodox theoria-reading, which understands the OT eschatologically in reference to the new, and modern Western historical-critical approached to reading the OT text. Short theological-exegetical exercise; longer essay. Recommended preparation TRT2110H.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
SAH2475HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/01/07

Searching for Catholic Spirituality in Modern History

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Welcome to the search for Christian spirituality. Beginning in New France, the investigation will travel through the evolution of spirituality in the Canadian Catholic community. After the Renaissance, Christian spirituality inspired communal liturgy, religious communities, colleges, and health-care services throughout the western world. After the Enlightenment, Christian spirituality continued to grow in world exploration, science, art, romanticism, and technology for an energetic future.  Attendance, participation, and a weekly one-page seminar paper (some are marked) 30%; research essay 40%; open book exam 30%.

 

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
KNH2559HF  L0101

History and Polity of the Korean Evangelical Holiness Church

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is primarily for students from the holiness tradition. Students will be encouraged to study thoroughly the roots and developments of Korea Evangelical Holiness Church in Korea and abroad as well. Due to lack of text books available in English, only two books will be used as text books. Students will be required to read chapter by chapter of the books to understand the historical background and polity of the denomination. The course will be in seminar format with lecture input, analysis of readings, student presentation and class discussion. Evaluation: Short Reflection Papers, class presentation, Final Reflection Paper.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Chun Hoi Heo
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
3000 Level Courses
TRH3055HF  L0101

The Nicene Revolution: Theological Change in the Fourth Century

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The fifty years between the Council of Nicaea in 325 and the Council of Constantinople in 381 were times of extraordinary theological change leading to understandings of God and Christ both continuous with and sharply different from earlier teaching, a true revolution. This course explores the process of doctrinal change during that period, both in its own right and as a paradigm for doctrinal change in later periods, including the present. Lectures, reading of original sources in translation, group discussion, research essay.

AD students enrol in TRH6055HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Richard Paul Vaggione
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
SMH3102HF  L0101

Early Christianity and Judaism

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the historical, religious, political, economic and social contexts of the birth of Christianity in the Holy Lands.  Special attention will be paid to the various relationships of Christian communities’ with Judaism, including the Jews revolts, the Minim and Ebionite controversies, the impact of the development of holy places of worship and pilgrimage, spirituality and monasticism, and the role of Roman and Byzantine emperors in the spread of Christianity.  The course will also deal with the Dead Sea Scrolls and other archaeological discoveries from the period.

AD students enrol in SMH6102HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Dan Bahat
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 12
TRH3236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

AD students enrol in TRH6236HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
ICH3350HS  L0101

Art, Religion and Theology: "Theologies" of Art in the Christian Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture in Eastern and Western Christendom. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Students will be evaluated on class participation, seminar presentations, and a research paper on an approved topic. The methodology used in the course will be a mix of lecture and class discussion on assigned readings. Class participation, 20%; seminar presentations, 30%; Major research paper, 50%.

AD students enrol in ICH6350HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
EMH3371HF  L0101

Varieties of North American Christianity

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year but will focus on issues related to approaches to spiritual formation and the relationships between individual experience, social transformation, and institutional identity in North American contexts. Seminar format involving student leadership; discussion of assigned readings, presentation of research.

AD students enrol in EMH6371HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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SAH3473HF  L0101

Issues in Catholic Education in Ontario

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course provides an historical analysis of the evolution of Catholic elementary and secondary schools in Ontario, from the 1830's to the present. In addition students will study the development separate school boards and legislation.

Schedule: Monday, 18:30 to 20:30
Instructors: Peter M. Meehan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
TRH3725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as 'liturgy' in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy. Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

AD students enrol in TRH6725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
RGH3755HF  L0101

Eastern Christian icons

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

AD students enrol in RGH6755HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
ICH3761HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/18

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

AD students enrol in ICH6761HS.

Schedule: Monday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TXH3806HS  L0101

Calvin, Wesley, & Canada

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will look at the Reformed and Methodist traditions associated with the theologies of John Calvin and John Wesley, their roots, development, and intersection, particularly in Canada. Themes such as mission, evangelism, engagement with society, theological convergences and controversies will be explored, with specific reference to The Presbyterian Church in Canada, The United Church of Canada, and their antecedent denominations. Lectures and discussion. Evaluation: Informed participation in group discussions; mid-term writing assignment; final project. This course will be held at Knox College

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart, Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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EMH3813HS  L0101

The History of Christianity in the United States

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the history of Christianity in the United States, within the context of how Christianity, the development of its theology, leadership, practice and expressions, have related to the cultural and public life of the nation. Lectures and discussions. Evaluation: informed participation in group discussions, both in-class and on-line, and a couple of writing assignments. 

AD students enrol in EMH6813HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Mark G. Toulouse
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 15
Additional Notes: This course fulfills the designated elective in history.

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KNH3840HF  L0101

What happened to the church? Theories of change in the church

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine various theories which have been proposed recently to explain changes which have occurred in recent years in the church in Western society. The theories will include secularization, rational choice, the Kelley thesis, and other theories found in the work of Callum Brown, Grace Davie and other. The course will involve both understanding the theories and critiquing them, with particular reference to the situation within the Canadian church. Evaluation: Seminar presentation; major paper. (Prerequisite: Introductory Church History Course)

AD students enrol in KNH6840HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMH3874HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/01/06

Immigrant Spirituality and Canadian Religions

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Canada is a nation of immigrants, and the Canadian religions are the religions of immigrants. The waves of religious immigrants will be studied including 17C French, 18C Irish and Scottish, 19C German, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian immigrants; 20C English, Italian, and Portuguese to the more recent Caribbean, Filipino, Chinese, Tamils, Vietnamese, and Korean religionists. The attitudes of Euro-Canadians will be examined as they progress from Anglo-Celtic Calvinism to Canadian secular multiculturalism. The techniques of archival research, historical analysis, and historiography will be explored. Seminar presentation and research paper. Class Presentation 30%; Research Essay 40%; Collaborative Recapitulation (open book exam) 30%.

AD students enrol in SMH6874HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
5000 Level Courses
WYH5001HF  L0101

Historiography

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Studies in the theory of history and methods of historical study and writing, related mainly to Christianity. Required of all AD students in the History Dept. Discussions in class (10%) and on-line (30%) of select historical works representing diverse approaches and interests; two short class presentations; two mid-length papers (30% each).

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Alan L. Hayes
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMH5054HF  L0101

Origen

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Study of Origen's life and thought in historical context. Reading and analysis of major works. Greek and Latin are useful but not required. Seminar presentations, participation in discussion, one research essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 10 · Crosslisted to: Theological
ICH5155HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013

Albert Eckhart Porete

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar examines Meister Ekhart's mystical discours and its conceptual configuration as a 'contradictory monism' against the backdrop of the "Dioysian" tradition of Albert the Great (and Thomas Aquinas) and the current efflorescence of women's mysticism represented by Marguerite Porete

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH5751HS  L0101

Mediaeval Liturgical Commentaries

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Most people, when the subject of mediaeval liturgy is mentioned, think of the old service books which have the words spoken (sacramentaries, lectionaries, missals, breviaries) and descriptions of the action (ordos). There is another class of book entirely, the liturgical commentaries, which goes through the public services, explaining the elements they contain. They were also interested in the ministers of the liturgy, their orders and dress, in the structure of church and altar, in the calendar (temporal and sanctoral), and of course in the vexed question of how a priest computed the date of Easter (no diocesan journals in those days). Teaching methods: shared reading of 5 commentaries with explanations by the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 2 · Max: 6
Additional Notes: Location: Main Trinity Building, TC24
ICH5752HS  L0101

With/Out Reason: Art and Imagination in the Western Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will explore the special relationship of the arts to the concept of the imagination in the history of Western thought. It will also consider the implications this relationship was had for art's role in the areas of theology and ethics, areas in which reason has been thought to fail in providing adequate knowledge.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:45 to 14:45
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
6000 Level Courses
TRH6055HF  L0101

The Nicene Revolution: Theological Change in the Fourth Century

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The fifty years between the Council of Nicaea in 325 and the Council of Constantinople in 381 were times of extraordinary theological change leading to understandings of God and Christ both continuous with and sharply different from earlier teaching, a true revolution. This course explores the process of doctrinal change during that period, both in its own right and as a paradigm for doctrinal change in later periods, including the present. Lectures, reading of original sources in translation, group discussion, research essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3055HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Richard Paul Vaggione
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
SMH6102HF  L0101

Early Christianity and Judaism

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the historical, religious, political, economic and social contexts of the birth of Christianity in the Holy Lands.  Special attention will be paid to the various relationships of Christian communities’ with Judaism, including the Jews revolts, the Minim and Ebionite controversies, the impact of the development of holy places of worship and pilgrimage, spirituality and monasticism, and the role of Roman and Byzantine emperors in the spread of Christianity.  The course will also deal with the Dead Sea Scrolls and other archaeological discoveries from the period.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMH3102HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Dan Bahat
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 12
TRH6236HS  L0101

Richard Hooker

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of all of the surviving works of Richard Hooker, often called the first theologian of Anglicanism, his Calvinism and reaction to Calvinism, his scholasticism, and his defence of the institutions of the Church of England. Seminars, short report and major paper. (Taught in alternate years)

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3236HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
ICH6350HS  L0101

Art, Religion and Theology: "Theologies" of Art in the Christian Tradition

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will explore significant ways that Christians have theologized the arts, artistry and art culture in Eastern and Western Christendom. The course will compare the varieties of theologies that have emerged from within the Protestant, Catholic, and Orthodox traditions. The study will involve looking at paintings, icons, altarpieces, and socially and culturally engaged works of art as well as pertinent theological writings. Students will be evaluated on class participation, seminar presentations, and a research paper on an approved topic. The methodology used in the course will be a mix of lecture and class discussion on assigned readings. Class participation, 20%; seminar presentations, 30%; Major research paper, 50%.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3350HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
EMH6371HF  L0101

Varieties of North American Christianity

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year but will focus on issues related to approaches to spiritual formation and the relationships between individual experience, social transformation, and institutional identity in North American contexts. Seminar format involving student leadership; discussion of assigned readings, presentation of research.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMH3371HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit

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TRH6725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as "liturgy" in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy. Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
RGH6755HF  L0101

Eastern Christian icons

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Emphasis on the history of the iconoclastic controversy and ecumenical councils, especially for the development of Christology. Readings from Nicaea II, Theodore the Studite, John of Damascus and Theodore Abu Qurrah. Iconography and spirituality. Church visit. Lectures-seminar, reflection papers, major paper. Prerequisite: Three courses from the Theological or Historical departments.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGH3755HF.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jaroslav Z. Skira
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
ICH6761HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/07/18

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3761HS.

Schedule: Monday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMH6813HS  L0101

The History of Christianity in the United States

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the history of Christianity in the United States, within the context of how Christianity, the development of its theology, leadership, practice and expressions, have related to the cultural and public life of the nation. Lectures and discussions. Evaluation: informed participation in group discussions, both in-class and on-line, and a couple of writing assignments.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMH3813HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Mark G. Toulouse
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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KNH6840HF  L0101

What happened to the church? Theories of change in the church

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine various theories which have been proposed recently to explain changes which have occurred in recent years in the church in Western society. The theories will include secularization, rational choice, the Kelley thesis, and other theories found in the work of Callum Brown, Grace Davie and other. The course will involve both understanding the theories and critiquing them, with particular reference to the situation within the Canadian church. Evaluation: Seminar presentation; major paper. (Prerequisite: Introductory Church History Course)

Basic Degree students enrol in KNH3840HF.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SMH6874HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/01/06

Immigrant Spirituality and Canadian Religions

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Canada is a nation of immigrants, and the Canadian religions are the religions of immigrants. The waves of religious immigrants will be studied including 17C French, 18C Irish and Scottish, 19C German, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian immigrants; 20C English, Italian, and Portuguese to the more recent Caribbean, Filipino, Chinese, Tamils, Vietnamese, and Korean religionists. The attitudes of Euro-Canadians will be examined as they progress from Anglo-Celtic Calvinism to Canadian secular multiculturalism. The techniques of archival research, historical analysis, and historiography will be explored. Seminar presentation and research paper. Class Presentation 30%; Research Essay 40%; Collaborative Recapitulation (open book exam) 30%.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMH3874HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Terence Fay, S.J.
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Pastoral Theology Crosslisted Courses
TRP3120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity.  Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar – or even offensive – to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades.  This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP’s importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP’s liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship.  Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and “churchmanship”.

Prerequisite: History of Christianity 2 or equivalent.

Assessment: weekly quizzes, two short papers.

AD students enrol in TRP6120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC22
TRP6120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity.  Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar – or even offensive – to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades.  This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP’s importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP’s liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship.  Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and “churchmanship”.

Prerequisite: History of Christianity 2 or equivalent.

Assessment: weekly quizzes, two short papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRP3120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Theological Crosslisted Courses
WYT2502HF  L6101

Anglican Theology

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2009 · Online Course

A study of Anglican Theology, principally through the reading of texts from Anglican thinkers of the 16th and 17th centuries. Study and discussion of the foundational themes of the English Reformation, as well as the 17th century development. The two great renewal movements of the 18th and 19th centuries: the evangelical movement and the Anglo-Catholic movement. The modern criticisms of the Anglican tradition. The question of Anglican identity and authority.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Smith
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Historical
RGT3115HF  L0101

Vatican II: The Theology and Historical Context of the Documents

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will study the documents of the Second Vatican Council with a view to understanding their theological foundations, their historical context and development, and their pastoral implications for today's church. One book report, total 20%; one discussion facilitation, total 10%; one document analysis paper, total 30%; one disputed issue paper, total 40%.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Historical
Enrollment Notes: Max 24
WYT3651HF  L0101

Theologies of Luther & Calvin

Offered in Fall 2013  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course of lectures will examine Luther's writings on the theology of the cross and on human freedom; and Calvin's writings on Scripture and the Christian life. Weekly readings and final examination (oral or written).

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SMT3670HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/07

Vatican II: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962)-1965) and their contemporary significance for students of ministry. Emphasis is on the historical context, the central theological content of each of the texts, and their relevance to professional ministry today. The course will consist of: weekly readings, seminar presentation on each of the documents, and focused in-class discussion,. Students will be evaluated on class participation as well as three smaller assignments; a background; an in-depth; and a pastoral, integrative final assignment , all of which are intended to assist students in exploring more deeply their own interest in the Council

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
SMT5615HS  L0101

Vatican II: Text and Context

Offered in Winter 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An in-depth study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) with an emphasis on the historical context, redaction history of the text, theological content, systematic relationships, and contemporary questions of conciliar reception and hermeneutics. The course will consist of weekly readings, seminar presentations and focused in-class discussion. Students will be evaluated on class participation, one seminar presentation and a research essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical

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